6 Better Productivity Hacks if the "Famous" Ones Never Work for You - Deepstash

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6 Better Productivity Hacks if the "Famous" Ones Never Work for You

https://www.themuse.com/advice/6-better-productivity-hacks-if-the-famous-ones-never-work-for-you

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6 Better Productivity Hacks if the "Famous" Ones Never Work for You
Imagine flying through your to-do list every day and having plenty of free time left over. Sound like a dream come true? That's the promise of productivity hacks. But, as somebody who's tried almost all of them, I've found that this fantasy doesn't always become reality.

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Find Your Golden Hours

Find Your Golden Hours

Schedule your most important tasks for the time of the day that suits you best.

It doesn't matter if you're not the most productive in the morning. Just find your golden hours and do your most important work then.

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Start Easy And Work Up

Start Easy And Work Up

Start with the small tasks, the ones you can finish in 10 minutes and run through them first.

You’ll feel motivated by the win of knocking out a couple of tasks quickly and ready to handle more serious work.

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From Start To Finish

From Start To Finish

If the Pomodoro Technique doesn't work for you and you prefer to do tasks from start to finish in one sitting, you should adjust your plan to fit with your focus.

So work until you complete those tasks, and then take a break.

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The "Done" List

The "Done" List

By writing down all the tasks you complete, you see where your time goes. 

By making a "done" list, you can make better decisions when you have hard data on your work, and you’ll be motivated to keep at it when you can actually see your progress.

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Adding Tasks Bit by Bit

 Adding Tasks Bit by Bit

If seeing your calendar all packed causes you extra stress, fill your calendar once a week.

This regular review gives you more flexibility but still lets you meet deadlines and stay on top of longer-term projects.

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Batching Tasks

Batching Tasks

Instead of reacting to things as soon as they show up, write them down and then later do a bunch at the same time. 

This prevents them from constantly interrupting your workflow, while still making sure everything gets done.

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Make planning a habit

Make planning a habit

Some mornings we feel motivated to create a to-do list, but that is often the exception. We need to get things done, even when we feel disengaged.

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Align your to-do list with goals

  1. Break down your big goals into daily tasks. You can't add "Get in shape" to your daily to-do list, but you can add "spend 30 minutes on my bike."
  2. Consider your week as a whole. You likely have multiple goals. Some goals benefit from daily activity, while working towards others a few times a week can create momentum.
  3. Add your have-to-do tasks last. We often fill our to-do lists with have-to-do tasks that crowd the whole day. Adding it last forces you to fit your have-to-do tasks around your goal tasks.

Have one daily priority

Many of us start our mornings with dozens of things we need to get done, but later realize that we haven't crossed any of them off our lists. We did get stuff done, but none of the things we planned.

A balm against hectic days that pass without progress is to choose a single activity to prioritize and protect in your calendar. If you struggle to select your top priority, ask yourself, when you look back on your day, what do you want the highlight to be? That's your priority.

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The Pomodoro Technique

Pomodoro is doing focused work in 25-minute sessions throughout the day. After each session, take a five-minute break. After completing four consecutive Pomodoros, take a 20 to 30-minute break.

The Problem with Pomodoro

Pomodoro is excellent for tackling tasks you don't feel like doing or jobs that require little thought.

However, other tasks, like writing or coding, require uninterrupted time. The problem with the Pomodoro method is that the timer is a consistent interruption that prevents you from getting into a state of flow.

The Flowtime Technique

It is a modified Pomodoro. And it solves Pomodoro's big problems.

  • It works by writing down one task you intend to work on during a focus session.
  • Then work until you start feeling tired or distracted, write down the end time, and take a break. A break can be anything from 5 minutes to 15 minutes.

Because you're not tied to a timer, you're more likely to find yourself in a flow state from time to time.

The time-blocking method

Simply means planning out your day in advance and dedicating specific hours to accomplish specific tasks.

Doing this requires determining in advance what you will accomplish and exactl...

The most important task method (MIT)

Rather than writing out a massive to-do list and trying to get it all done, determine the 1-3 tasks that are absolutely essential and then relentlessly focus on those tasks during the day.

Once you determine your 1-3 most important tasks, they are scheduled first in your day. You then make progress on essential items before you get bombarded by distractions. 

The Pomodoro Technique

Is all about working in short, massively productive, intensely focused bursts, and then giving yourself a brief break:

  • Choose a task
  • Set your timer for 25 minutes
  • Work on the task until the timer ends
  • Take a short break (around 5 minutes)
  • Every 4 Pomodoro sessions, take a longer break (15-30 minutes).