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How to Identify and Learn from Your Mistakes

https://lifehacker.com/how-to-identify-and-learn-from-your-mistakes-5863490

lifehacker.com

How to Identify and Learn from Your Mistakes
It's never easy to admit you've made a mistake, but it's a crucial step in learning, growing, and improving yourself. Writer and speaker Scott Berkun's new essay collection, Mindfire: Big Ideas for Curious Minds, examines, among other things, how to learn from your mistakes.

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Learning from mistakes

Learning from mistakes

You can only learn from a mistake after you admit you've made it.

Don't start blaming other people (or the universe) for the things that go wrong, because you distance yourself from any possible lesson. 

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How we perceive failure

How we perceive failure

We see mistakes and failure as shameful things. And we usually identify with them:

If I fail a test, then I am a failure. If I make a mistake then I am a mistake.

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Learning from mistakes

It requires three things:

  • Putting yourself in situations where you can make interesting mistakes.
  • Having the self-confidence to admit to them.
  • Being courageous about making changes.

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The 4 kinds of mistakes

  • Stupid: Absurdly dumb things that just happen. 
  • Simple: Mistakes that are avoidable but your sequence of decisions made inevitable. 
  • Involved: Mistakes that are understood but require effort to prevent.
  • Complex: Mistakes that have complicated causes and no obvious way to avoid next time. 

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Mistakes and humor

When you can laugh at your own mistakes you know you've accepted it and no longer judge yourself on the basis of one single event. 

Humor loosens up your psychology and prevents you from obsessing about the past.

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Beginner's Luck

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Anything Is Possible For The Beginner

To the beginner, anything Is possible. They are not blocked by experience and are willing to try out many possibilities and solve problems creatively.

The expert has narrowed down the possibilities and can become too comfortable with their own perspectives.

Experts Break Under Pressure

When you are good at something, you're under pressure to perform at your level.

A novice doesn't particularly care how they perform and doesn't feel any pressure to perform.

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Limiting Mistakes With Humor

Humor is a great psychological tool to get and keeping people on your side. Use it wisely, and use it often—especially when you screw up.

The next time you find yours...

The Tom Brokaw Method

... to recover from a mistake with humor:

  • Acknowledge the mistake. There’s no hiding it now. Everyone saw!
  • Correct the mistake. If it’s necessary, make whatever correction you need to get things back on track.
  • Make a joke. Make fun of yourself. Get everyone laughing and they won’t care anymore.
  • Move on! And don’t bring up your flub again until you’re totally in the clear.

Not saying No

First, say yes to your core values, then say no to the situation. Finally, say yes to the relationship.

A not-to-do list or some predefined phrases will help you to say no in unexpect...

Not respecting your calendar

Treat the meeting with yourself as it was a meeting with a third party. It’s only you who can act on your most important tasks with priority.

Make sure that you set up boundaries for yourself and for other people. Remember to communicate with them clearly.

Such a boundary can be that you leave your office at a certain time each day because your family is your priority. It doesn’t mean, of course, that you can’t work later in periods of high workload.

Multitasking

Ringing phones, text messages, reminders, pop-ups, social media, email.

There’re countless studies demonstrating that multitasking will hinder your work both in terms of quality and quantity. 

Resist the temptation to get in the loop and do one thing at a time.