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Ways to Stop Thinking About Journaling and Actually Start Journaling

https://www.themuse.com/advice/8-ways-to-stop-thinking-about-journaling-and-actually-start-journaling

themuse.com

Ways to Stop Thinking About Journaling and Actually Start Journaling
We've talked before about the power of journaling. Setting aside some dedicated time to meditate on and write about your life-and your job-can not only help you keep a record of your day-to-day and keep track of things you want to remember, but can actually help you deal with tough situations, think toward the future, dig up new ideas, and more.

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Journaling Before You Get Out of Bed

Journaling Before You Get Out of Bed

Try grabbing your notebook as soon as your alarm goes off and writing for a few minutes before your feet even hit the ground.

This way you know it will get done, and the activity first thing in the morning may help wake your brain up.

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Use a Journaling App

While many people recommend journaling in a physical notebook to give your brain a break from screens, if you’re having a hard time keeping up that practice, you can try using an app that you can whip out when you have an extra moment in the day.

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Don’t Use Full Sentences

Don’t Use Full Sentences

Feel free to have your journal as disjointed as you want.

Leo Babatua of ZenHabits says he only writes his journal in bullet points; just three to six per day. By making it this easy, he says it’s much more attainable for him to keep it up.

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Journaling on a Calendar

Journaling on a Calendar

Instead of getting a notebook to journal in, get a (large) desk calendar or date book, and then just challenge yourself to write a sentence or two every day, on that day.

This small amount of writing a day feels attainable. By writing it on a calendar, it’s very obvious when you’ve missed a day.

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Make a Template for Your Journal

Sometimes the hardest part of journaling is staring at a blank page and not knowing what to write about.

Create a template that you follow every day. Maybe that’s writing three things you’re grateful for every day, or asking yourself a question each day, like “What can I do to make tomorrow better than today?” If it’s helpful, you can create printable journaling “worksheets” that lay out the activities you’ve promised yourself to do.

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Find Fun Prompts for Your Journal

Find Fun Prompts for Your Journal

Find a bunch of interesting prompts that you’re excited to write about, and then spend each day journaling on a different one.

Search for “journaling prompts” and start collecting your favorites. Compile them all in a Word document or on the first page of your journal and work your way down the list.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Journaling as therapy

Labeling emotions and acknowledging traumatic events, both natural outcomes of journaling, have a known positive effect on people, and are often incorporated into traditional talk therapy.

Morning Pages

3 pages of longhand writing, strictly stream-of-conscious, done as soon as one wakes.

They are not meant to be art. Or even writing. They need not be smart, or funny, or particularly deep. It's a form of “brain drain”, a way to expel all that angry, petty stuff that spirals through our subconscious and muddies our days.

Benefits of Journaling

  • Boost in mindfulness
  • Better memory
  • Better communication skills
  • Improves mental health
  • Better sleep
  • A stronger immune system
  • More self-confidence
  • Higher I.Q.

John Dewey

"We do not learn from experience…we learn from reflecting on experience."

John Dewey

The Benefits of Journaling

  • Research reveals that people who journal have a 25% increase in performance when compared to people who do not journal.
  • Journaling helps improve well-being after traumatic and stressful events.
  • Journaling improves communication skills. Writing reflects clear thinking, and in turn, clear communication.
  • Journaling before bed decreases cognitive stimulus, rumination, and worry, allowing you to fall asleep faster.
  • Reflective writing reduces intrusive and avoidant thoughts about negative events.

The Goals of Keeping A Journal

  • You can bring your problems to a journal. Journaling is you figuring things out and clearing your head.
  • Leave your destructive thoughts in your journal. We all carry around destructive thoughts about the things that went wrong. Instead of holding our thoughts in our head, we can put it down on paper.
  • Keep a journal for your grandchildren. Fifty years from now, our own notebooks will be around to astonish and inspire our grandchildren, unlike our tweets and Facebook posts.
  • Journal for your future self. Produce something that you can look back on and learn from.

Forget all the rules others impose about a journal. Do what works for you.

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Adjust Your Mindset

Your first notebook will be your learning notebook. Like any productivity method, it will take time to find a bullet journaling flow and structure that works for you. 

Any creative en...

The first steps

  1. Get a Journal and Writing Utensils
  2. Start an Index Page: The backbone of your BuJo system, like a table of contents in a book
  3. Create Logs - places where you can brain-dump tasks, projects, goals
  4. Pick Signifiers: Many people use bullets for lists of tasks, circles for events, and dashes for notes. 
  5. Document Items with Collections: Collections are running lists and anything you want to remember for later(like blog topics, books you want to read etc.)

The 3 common types of logs:

  • A future log helps you keep track of items that aren’t yet on your immediate radar.
  • Monthly logs include things like calendars and categorized goal lists for the next 30 days.
  • Daily logs may includes entries of to-dos, meetings, and reminders.