How to Give Great Advice - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

How to Give Great Advice

https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/228018

entrepreneur.com

How to Give Great Advice
3 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. How many times have you offered advice only to watch that person make the opposite choice? The way we usually give advice -- by imposing our own opinion -- is often ineffective, and even harmful.

4

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

Only give advice when asked

Only give advice when asked

Unsolicited advice sends a message that you're jumping in because they can't handle the problem. It leaves them feeling less competent and capable, undermining their ability to handle the situation themselves. 

To ensure that your advice is more helpful than harmful, only share it if you're explicitly asked.

144 SAVES

178 READS


VIEW

Offer information

When giving advice, people with more experience often make the mistake of assuming that they know best.

To offer expertise in a way that's truly helpful, use it to inform the person about the decision at hand. Tell them what you know about their options, possibly offering a recommendation, then let them use that information to make a sound decision.

120 SAVES

129 READS


Help think through the problem

Instead of imposing your opinion, guide them through the process you might use to reach a conclusion. Ask the questions you would ask yourself, and give them an opportunity to talk through the options with you. That approach will help build problem-solving skills that translate to future dilemmas.

125 SAVES

118 READS


Express confidence

If someone comes to you for advice, let them know that you’re here to help but you trust them to make an intelligent decision. Your confidence may be all the advice they need.

136 SAVES

155 READS


SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The Advice Trap

The Advice Trap

It happens when one rushes to provide advice, which is most likely to be discarded or ignored, even if the person was asked for it.

Even with good intentions, providing advice isn’...

Word Play When Asking For Advice

When someone mentions a problem, it most likely isn’t the core problem but only an outward symptom.

Even if by some miracle one is able to find out the real problem, it does not mean that the advice doled out will be useful or will be implemented.

Ignorance And Superficial Knowledge

Most people are ignorant of their ignorance and live in a self-created bubble of superficial knowledge, which they believe is the only true knowledge there is, due to a cognitive bias known as the Dunning-Kruger effect.

A piece of straightforward advice doled out to be followed to the tee, is often due to lack of knowledge, rather than because of it.

3 more ideas

Top Characteristics of a Great Networker

Top Characteristics of a Great Networker
  1. Good listener.
  2. Positive attitude: it makes people want to cooperate and associate with you.
  3. Collaborative to serve others. 
  4. Sincere

Avoid tension and build rapport

Avoid tension and build rapport

This underscores the importance of starting on the right foot.  If you upset the person you’re trying to help, they’ll wall themselves off. 

It's important to use empath...

Focus on collaboration

To get someone to act on your advice, it’s going to mean giving up at least some of the credit for it. 

When the person receiving your advice feels like they had a hand in creating it—with guidance from you, the expert, of course—they’re far more likely to act on it.

Show your work

In this case, you’re showing your work because it instills trust, and trust is critical for acceptance. 

When you show you work, the person you’re advising doesn’t have to take your recommendations on blind faith. They can see exactly how you got to your advice and buy into it along the way.