Why the right kind of ignorance can be a good thing - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

Why the right kind of ignorance can be a good thing

https://ideas.ted.com/why-the-right-kind-of-ignorance-strategic-ignorance-can-be-a-good-thing/

ideas.ted.com

Why the right kind of ignorance can be a good thing
Strategic ignorance is not about being closed-minded. It’s about knowing what you want and knowing you can be swayed, says Benjamin Hardy.

3

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

Endless choices are rabbit holes to nowhere

Endless choices are rabbit holes to nowhere

With infinite options come increased choices. More choices mean more decisions. However, choice overload makes you question your decisions. This leads to decision fatigue and can cause you to get stuck in negative cycles. You may constantly question the decisions you’ve made and be left wondering what could have been.

Instead of inviting more choices, you need discernment and confidence to close more doors until you're unaware of them.

179 SAVES

881 READS

VIEW

Intentionally moving forward

The best decision-makers purposefully avoid almost all of the options available.

To commit to one decision means closing the door on everything else. It takes confidence to say, "This is what I'm serious about. I can't be distracted by everyone else's noise and agendas." If you're serious about achieving goals, you must create an environment that shields you from other noise.

203 SAVES

626 READS

Strategic ignorance

Strategic ignorance is not about being closed-minded. It's knowing what you want.

It's realizing how easy a person can be derailed. You even avoid amazing situations that you know is really a distraction. You create boundaries and live your priorities and values and dreams.

192 SAVES

706 READS

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Ignorance Of Our Own Ignorance

Ignorance Of Our Own Ignorance

The Dunning-Kruger Effect is the mind's tendency to overestimate one’s own knowledge or competence and to underestimate one’s own ignorance. It usually occurs when the informat...

The Four Types Of Information

  • Known Knowns: Things we know, like how to ride a bicycle.
  • Known Unknowns: Stuff we don’t understand, like quantum physics.
  • Unknown Knowns: Things we know but never realized that we knew it. Most of it comes naturally to us, like parenting or crying.
  • Unknown Unknowns: This is the information we have no clue about, and we don’t even know the fact that we don’t have a clue about this.

Most people have information in all these four types, making each brain a combination of a labyrinth and a jigsaw puzzle.

The Emotional Awareness Blindspot

We are heavily blind-spotted with regards to our unknown unknowns as we continue to believe our own rhetoric and start to project it on others.

Our delusion is further complicated by the fact that even if people point to us our problem, we are unable to believe them, due to our lack of emotional awareness.

5 more ideas

Benefits of Being Wrong

  • Accepting vulnerability
  • Embracing a learning mind
  • Opening to new possibilities
  • Prioritizing self-growth over reputation.

We default to being rig...

Knowing things

There is no inherent value in knowledge of a fact.

Two things are far more important than what you know: What you can learn, and what you know you don’t need to know.

Identifying what doesn't matter

The most valuable skill for success in diverse circumstances might be the ability to quickly identify what doesn’t matter. 

Discern what is not of fundamental importance and ignore it.

Humility and self-confidence

Successful people know what they don’t need to know and they don’t waste effort trying to learn it.

But most people feel pressure to know a lot of useless stuff because it will save them the embarrassment of ever appearing to not know something.