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Psychological Skepticism | Nick Wignall

https://nickwignall.com/psychological-skepticism/

nickwignall.com

Psychological Skepticism | Nick Wignall
Psychological skepticism means that you're thoughtful about the content of your own mind—neither ignoring nor blindly trusting what it sends you.

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Psychological skepticism

Psychological skepticism

Psychological skepticism means being neutral toward the contents of your mind.

Most of us are overly trusting of our own minds. But information is not always the truth. Just like the media inundates us with questionable information, our brains do the same thing.

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Your mind is just guessing

Emotions, thoughts, and memories may give us useful information, but they are also likely to be unhelpful, inaccurate, or misleading.

For example, when you hear a rattling noise while out hiking, your fear may make you proceed more cautiously. However, fear of your coworkers who think you're dumb keeps you from participating in important meetings.

The information your mind sends you in the form of emotions, thoughts, memories, desires, etc., relates to simply guesses, which means it's unwise to put blind faith in it.

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Embracing psychological skepticism

Remind yourself that just because you have a thought doesn't make it true. Just because you feel an emotion doesn't make it significant.

When we deal with our thoughts, emotions, and painful memories, we should consider embracing psychological skepticism - the middle road between ignoring the content of your mind or taking it as gospel.

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