Why People Lie | Reasons for Lying | Paul Ekman Group - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

Why People Lie | Reasons for Lying | Paul Ekman Group

https://www.paulekman.com/blog/why-people-lie/

paulekman.com

Why People Lie | Reasons for Lying | Paul Ekman Group
"I thought I was only going 55 miles an hour officer" claims the driver speeding at 70 mph. "My wristwatch stopped so I had no idea that I got home 2 hours after my curfew", says the teenager.

2

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

Reasons for serious lies

  • To avoid punishment. These lies are told when there is a threat of loss if the lie is uncovered. 
  • Concealing a benefit. These lies are told to conceal the reward obtained by breaching a law or expectation.
  • Protecting yourself or someone else from serious harm.

119 SAVES


VIEW

Telling trivial lies

  • The thrill of it all. Some people lie to see if they can get away with it.
  • Avoiding embarrassment. People tell untruths to get out of an awkward social situation.
  • Being polite. Practicing deceptions is sometimes required socially.

102 SAVES


SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Types of lies

Types of lies
  • White Lies. People tell white lies claiming to be tactful or polite.
  • Broken Promises. Failure to keep one’s spoken commitment or promise.
  • The Lie of ...

Manage your bias

Deceptive people can flood you with truthful answers and make you believe that they are good people. 

Filter through all the information that is meant to deceive you to get to the real u...

Recognize evasiveness

A deceptive person will talk around the issue without actually answering the initial question. 

Watch for failure to deny

Listen and search for the direct denial of an accusation. 

A guilty person will try to qualify the situation by  saying words like “not really” or “not for the most part.” 

4 more ideas

The prevalent theory of dishonesty

From a legal perspective, dishonesty is the idea of cost-benefit analysis. When people think about being dishonest, they wonder what can be gained or what can be lost. If the cost of lying is too h...

The slippery slope

People often feel the need to rationalize their dishonesty. The danger is taking that first step.

The story of Joe Papp, an Olympic cyclist falls into this category. Papp consulted his physician, who wrote Papp a prescription for erythropoietin (EPO), a cancer treatment that increases the production of red blood cells. Papp injected himself, but also imported and distributed EPO to his team and to other teams. This essentially made him a drug dealer.

Morals or ethics tilt behaviors 

People that are required to put their signature at the top of a document instead of the bottom are more likely to provide truthful information.

They are confirming that the information they’re about to provide is true before they have a chance to falsify it.