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Negative Visualization Is the Antidote to Hedonic Adaptation

https://www.njlifehacks.com/negative-visualization-antidote-to-hedonic-adaptation/

njlifehacks.com

Negative Visualization Is the Antidote to Hedonic Adaptation
We get used to what we have, joy fades quickly, and we want something newer. That's called Hedonic Adaptation. Negative visualization is the Stoics' remedy.

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Hedonic Adaptation: Eternal Dissatisfaction

When we obtain our desires, needs and wants, we quickly get accustomed to it, taking those shiny toys for granted, and easily getting bored with them. We mistakenly look for happiness in this hedonic adaptation, a thirst that never gets quenched.

Short bursts of happiness that diminish after a week don't represent real happiness.

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Our Happiness Formula Is Wrong

Our Happiness Formula Is Wrong

We have, since the beginning, a wrong formula implanted in our minds about the pursuit of happiness. We think if we do amazing work, attain big success, then we will be happy eventually.

The reality is that new goals are constantly on the horizon, and our so-called happiness keeps getting pushed further and further away. This leads to a feeling of emptiness, not happiness or contentment when a goal is fulfilled.

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Happiness Comes First, Then Success

The real formula for success is to be happy first. If you are happy, and your work is great as a result, excellence is assured, which leads to success.

A happy person gravitates towards positivity, intelligence, creativity and better energy, and success then has no choice but to be associated with the person.

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The Big Lottery Story

A famous study chronicling the life of the lucky lottery winners had a startling lesson: Within one year, all of the lucky people reported the same level of happiness as before they had the windfall, with many coming off worse than before.

On the other end, many people who have had tragic disabilities in life, end up normalizing the same and returning to the original level of happiness within one year. Extreme events, negative or positive, do not permanently change our level of happiness.

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Negative Visualization: Pushing The Arrow

Imagining possible negative scenarios vividly provides us with an alternate life which is unbearable. By consciously thinking about losing what we have, we start to appreciate and be grateful for all that is bought by us or is gifted to us, like a loving family, or the car we drive.

By thinking negatively, we push the arrow backwards on the bow, providing it strength to move forward towards positivity at a greater velocity.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Hedonic adaptation

It explains our tendency as human beings to chase happiness, only to return back to our original emotional baseline after getting what we want. 

We run on a hedonic treadmill...

Tal Ben-Shahar

Tal Ben-Shahar

"Attaining lasting happiness requires that we enjoy the journey on our way toward a destination we deem valuable. Happiness is not about making it to the peak of the mountain nor is it about climbing aimlessly around the mountain; happiness is the experience of climbing toward the peak."

Cultivate More Happiness

  • Find your right fit or match, both personally and professionally.
  • Appreciating life’s small moments.
  • Smile more, even if you don’t feel like it.
  • Perform random acts of kindness.
  • Spend money on experiences versus things.
  • Avoid comparisons.
  • Build and maintain close relationships.
  • Make little changes in your daily routine: getting more sleep, exercising, getting out into nature, and meditating.

Hedonic Adaptation

... also referred to as hedonic treadmill, is defined as "the observed tendency of humans to quickly return to a relatively stable level of happiness despite major positive or negative events or...

Elements of Hedonic Adaptation

  • Shifting adaptation levels: When an individual experiences a slight emotional up or down, and then returns to his or her default level of happiness.
  • Desensitization: When an individual becomes desensitized to a circumstance or situation they no longer have the same reactions that another person might experience. 
  • Sensitization: When an individual is sensitized to a certain situation, they get used to something that they were not previously accustomed to. 

Hedonic Adaptation Critics

Critics view the hedonic adaptation tendency as a generalization that fails to take potentially shifting factors into account.

  • Significant life events such as loss of employment or the end of a major relationship can change one's original level of contentment.
  • Negative events are often more significant than positive ones.
  • Consuming certain medication may also alter the set level of happiness in a person who has mental illness or other clinical problems.

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We All Tend To Make The Same Mental Mistakes

We All Tend To Make The Same Mental Mistakes

Economists used to believe that people will always choose the option that maximizes their well-being. But people act against their rational self-interest all the time.

We p...

The Mere Urgency Effect

This bias addresses why we do unimportant tasks we think are time-sensitive over tasks that are not time-sensitive, even if the non-time-sensitive tasks provide greater rewards.

How to overcome this bias:

  • Use the Eisenhower Matrix. It will reveal the urgent/not urgent and important/not important tasks.
  • Block off on your calendar the most productive 2-4 hours each day for your most important work.
  • Only answer emails at specific times. Don't allow email to bleed into other time.
  • Give your important tasks a deadline and find a way to commit to it.

The Zeigarnik Effect

This effect describes our tendency to remember incomplete or interrupted tasks better than completed tasks. Each unfinished task takes up some of your attention, splitting your focus. It also interferes with your sleep.

What you can do about it:

  • Write your tasks down as soon as they come to you.
  • Have a system in place for organizing and regularly reviewing your tasks.
  • Have an end of work shutdown ritual, so your unfinished tasks don't stay in your mind after-hours.
  • Take a small step to help you get started. The act of starting can help you keep going to the end.
  • Don't forget to review your completed tasks and celebrate what you've already accomplished.