Treat Failure Like a Scientist - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

Treat Failure Like a Scientist

https://jamesclear.com/failure-scientist

jamesclear.com

Treat Failure Like a Scientist
I recently had a wonderful conversation with my friend, Beck Tench. During our chat, Beck told me about an interesting shift in thinking that occurred while she worked at a science museum. During her time there, Beck said that she learned how to treat failure like a scientist.

2

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

Treating Failure Like a Scientist

When a scientist runs an experiment, there are all sorts of results that could happen: Some are positive and some are negative, but all of them are data points. Each result is a piece of data that ...

52 SAVES


VIEW

Failure as an indicator of worth

Failure feels like an indication of who we are as a person. Failing a test means you’re not smart enough. Failing to get fit means you’re undesirable. Failing in business means you don’t have what ...

31 SAVES


VIEW

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Fear of failure

We are taught from a young age that failure is bad and something to fear. But, failure is an excellent stepping stone to success. 

We never learn to move out of our comfort zone ...

Failure is temporary

... and failure is good even if it feels really bad when it happens.

 Look for the greater message of the experience and expect it to, eventually, turn out for the good.

Routine failing

It means you are actually active, doing something, moving forward.

We limit ourselves, and we impede our ability to make big things happen when we buy into what society says will work or not work.

We must take a leap, take calculated risks, and be patient for the results. We don’t need to have everything worked out beforehand.

one more idea

Pursue what appears to be a paradox

It will force you to reexamine the full body of evidence with new eyes.

Seeking relevant knowledge in unfamiliar disciplines increases the odds of serendipitous insights and ...

Spot contradictions and novel patterns

Go on cross-disciplinary research expeditions.

By reading and translating the literature in fields outside your own, the full body of evidence surrounding a problem become apparent. 

Focus on data and methods

Ignore the author’s conclusions.

When you are doing cross-disciplinary research what really matters is the structure of the full body of evidence rather than any authors’ particular interpretation of their data in one paper, which is often biased. 

Thomas Edison on failure

Thomas Edison's most memorable invention was the light bulb, which purportedly took him 1,000 tries before he developed a successful prototype: How did it feel to fail 1,000 times?”

Failure Is Life’s Greatest Teacher

Failure and defeat are life’s greatest teachers [but] sadly, most people, and particularly conservative corporate cultures, don’t want to go there...Instead they choose to play it safe, to fly below the radar, repeating the same safe choices over and over again. They operate under the belief that if they make no waves, they attract no attention; no one will yell at them for failing because they generally never attempt anything great at which they could possibly fail (or succeed).” 

 - Ralph Heath

Failure is essential for success

The prevailing school of thought in progressive companies—such as Intuit, General Electric, Corning and Virgin Atlantic—is that great success depends on great risk, and failure is simply a common byproduct. Executives of such organizations don’t mourn their mistakes but instead parlay them into future gains.