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In 2020, Resolve To Ask "Why?"

https://www.forbes.com/sites/brycehoffman/2020/01/07/in-2020-resolve-to-ask-why/

forbes.com

In 2020, Resolve To Ask "Why?"
Back in the 1980s, a German theoretical psychologist named Dietrich Dörner conducted a fascinating series of experiments that offered amazing insights into the differences between good decision makers and bad ones. He and his team used computers to create simulations of complex, interconnected systems ranging from small towns to African countries.

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Bad Decision Makers

In a range of computer simulation experiments conducted by theoretical psychologist Dietrich Dörner, some common traits were found in the bad decision-makers:

  • They focus on only one aspect of the problem, but most problems may be multidimensional.
  • They jump haphazardly from one problem to another.
  • They do not factor in the indirect consequences of their actions.

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Good Decision Makers

In the same experiment, there were traits discovered for good decision-makers:

  • They tend to think and act holistically.
  • Their approach towards a problem is systematic.
  • They are willing to try diverse approaches, showing open-mindedness.

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Asking Why

Good Decision-makers always ask 'Why?' Asking 'Why?' several times gets to the core issue and provides us with insight into the real reason for solving a particular problem.

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Don’t make an important decision

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