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Experts Explain Why Mondays Are So Psychologically Hard

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/why-mondays-hard-psychologically_l_5fb0375ac5b68baab0fcbf8c

huffpost.com

Experts Explain Why Mondays Are So Psychologically Hard
Here are some different reasons why this day can be particularly rough.

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Your body’s natural rhythm is messed up on weekends

Your body’s natural rhythm is messed up on weekends

People’s moods are commonly at their lowest on Mondays. The main reason is that we cram as much as possible into a weekend.

Many people are eating and drinking too much, and going to sleep later. Catching up with family and friends requires emotional and logistical energy. By Monday, we are more tired than we want to be, which directly correlates with a low mood.

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Losing the sense of freedom

Monday follows after two days of freedom and enjoyment. Even busy weekends have plenty of moments to relax.

People find it psychologically challenging to switch back into obligations and routines that they have little say over. It may feel like a loss of independence and control.

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When we don’t love our jobs

Disliking your job or finding it very stressful can cause you to dread Mondays.

Even if you enjoy your job, additional stressors can make it more challenging, such as employment insecurity or feeling misaligned in your purpose at work. Once you accept that every job will have its struggles, you can move with the stress, not against it.

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When we're not prepared for a new week

People often dislike Mondays if they didn't prepare for the start of the week emotionally and logistically.

Many people fail to realize they subconsciously prepared to fail. If we don't plan, Mondays can be very stressful and unbearable.

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Our poor work-life balance

People who spend almost all of their time working may experience negative feelings on Monday. It is the mind and body telling them to slow down or take a break.

Even if you love what you do, working hard all week without taking breaks can take a toll on your mind and body.

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People that don't deal well with transitions

Mondays involve transitions where you have to face the unknown. You may be anticipating the stressors it may bring, such as anxiety about all the work on your plate, or social anxiety.

People with complicated life circumstances can also feel anxious about transitions.

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Living for the weekend

Someone who sees their weekend experience as the only source of happiness will feel like Monday is the end of their life.

Leading a double life - that of paying bills and going to work on the one side, and personal enjoyment on weekends on the other side - will always lead to difficult Mondays, unless the two can be merged.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

No One Likes Mondays

No One Likes Mondays

Various studies have documented the Monday Blues, which essentially is an imposition on the working person, a loss of freedom coupled with the arrival of work-related stress.

Counter The Monday Blues: An Early Start

  • Prepare mentally, physically and logistically for Monday in advance, to decrease the dread of unknown problems or tasks.
  • It is helpful to have sound sleep on Sunday, with the alcohol consumption minimized.
  • It is extremely beneficial to get to work early on a Monday, getting a headstart on things.
  • Plan ahead for the week with something to look forward to, maybe on the coming Friday.

Manage Your Mondays Like A Pro

  • A special Monday treat, casual dress day, or a pizza day for the entire team can be something to look forward to. Even not cooking that day, or a workout class can bring a creative break to the stressful routine.
  • Focusing on your thoughts and feelings helps you absorb the negativity and understand how to steer the mind towards a solution.
  • Less social media surfing during weekends also contributes to your positive mental outlook, as the feeds are mostly negative or provocative.

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Avoid having a Manic Monday

  • Write down your top 3 priorities to get done on Monday and plan your schedule around them.
  • Review your calendar for the upcoming week and tie key tasks or events to it so you know exac...

Get errands out of the way

Sundays are a great day to get your errands out of the way, like grocery shopping. Also, take time for cooking meals, cleaning rooms, or dropping things off at different shops. You most likely don't have the time and energy to do these activities after work.

But don’t spend all of Sunday on these tasks. Even though they’re important, you still need some time to decompress.

Schedule something fun

Make sure you also do something you enjoy, like brunch with friends or spending time with your family. 

This gives you something to look forward to during the week and it also helps you to disconnect.

Why Monday looms so large

Hating Monday is practically an international pastime. There’s a bit of a collective conscience that Mondays suck.

Social media the idea that Mondays...

Anticipatory anxiety

The Sunday are a form of “anticipatory anxiety,” that's why concerns might creep in as you consider the upcoming week.

Worrying about future events is human nature. But prolonged anxiety can lead to chronic stress, which increases your risk of health problems, including depression, heart disease, digestive problems, sleep issues, and more.

Plan some Sunday self-care

Treating yourself well on Sunday can help you feel better about Monday. You can try:

  • Serenity—a form of relaxation, like meditation or deep breathing
  • Exercise—anything from yoga to running
  • Love—expressing gratitude
  • Food—eating nutrient-rich foods high in vitamin B6 and avoiding caffeine and alcohol.