I have forgotten how to read - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

I have forgotten how to read

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/i-have-forgotten-how-toread/article37921379/

theglobeandmail.com

I have forgotten how to read
Author of Solitude: A Singular Life in a Crowded World and The End of Absence: Reclaiming What We've Lost in an Age of Constant Connection. Turning, one evening, from my phone to a book, I set myself the task of reading a single chapter in one sitting. Simple. But I couldn't.

5

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

Reading in the digital age

Reading in the digital age

Online life makes us into a new kind of reader: Our attention fractures. Online reading is about clicks, and comments, and points. 

The opposite of the traditional reading experience, with lineal structure, that demands our full attention.

119 SAVES

220 READS

VIEW

<p>Not every emotion can be re...

Not every emotion can be reduced to an emoji, and not every thought can be conveyed via tweet.

117 SAVES

238 READS

Cynical Readers

Cynical Readers

We have become cynical readers – we read in the disjointed, goal-oriented way that online life encourages & we stop exercising our attention. 

We read just as much if not more. We live in a text-gorged society in which the most fleeting thought is a thumb-dash away from posterity. It's how we read that changed.

101 SAVES

178 READS

We are primed for distractions

We are primed for distractions
One famous study found humans would rather give themselves electric shocks than sitting alone with their thoughts for 10 minutes.

115 SAVES

215 READS

Books as a marketing platform

Books as a marketing platform

A book is really just a reverse-engineered TED Talk. It's a platform that lets you do a speaking tour.

99 SAVES

208 READS

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Self-help

We like reading about self-help but are skeptical at the same time. Any attempt to articulate a theory against self-help ends up sounding like self-help itself.

Some self-help is terr...

Knowledge and wisdom

  • A knowledgeable person can solve a narrow set of problems that few can, like a neurosurgeon.
  • A wise person knows what to do in most situations. She is able to give out general purpose, one-size-fits-all advice. Wisdom is very easy to understand. However, it is very difficult to apply in real life.

Self-help through the wisdom lens

The purpose of self-help is to acquire wisdom. Self-help books are filled with wisdom. 

It embarrasses us because it's full of easy truisms. We like it because it makes sense. It's trivial to read but nearly impossible to put into practice. That is why we feel so inspired when reading about it.

3 more ideas

Reframing excuses we make for not reading:

  • Time: Stop thinking of it as some activity that you do when you feel like it. It should be a reflex, a default.
  • Money: Reading is not a luxury. It’s a necessity.
  • Purpose: Whate...

The purpose of reading

The purpose of reading is not just raw knowledge. Reading is part of the human experience. It helps you find meaning, understand yourself, and make your life better.  

Reading more

If you want to read more, there’s no real secret. It’s about adjusting your priorities and your perception so that reading becomes an extension of who you are and what you do.

Corporate Speak

Corporate Speak

Corporations have a language that they use while talking in meetings or communicating in email. It’s called Corporate Jargon.

Corporate jargon is a forced and complicated way to exp...

Language With No Substance

  • The corporate jargon is often described as fluffy, without any real substance and aimed towards the speaker’s self-inflated ego.
  • Words are substituted for analogies and references that take longer to process, and have the intention of wrapping, hiding or impeding actual, effective communication.

The Emporer's New Clothes

Corporate speak may not mean anything of value to anyone in a meeting, but like the Emperor's New Clothes, no one wants to point out the inefficiency and mind-numbing nature of the constant use of the jargon. Everyone pretends that they are on the same page as everyone else.