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How to Memorize a Speech | Scott H Young

https://www.scotthyoung.com/blog/2018/07/17/memorize-speech/

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How to Memorize a Speech | Scott H Young

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Memorizing Speeches

Memorizing Speeches
  • Once in our lives, we'll be able to get the chance of speaking in front of many people, doing declamations or oratorical and memorizing a speech is a useful skill to learn.
  • Delivering a speech helps us to build our confidence and exude it at the same time.
  • Speeches should feel natural, even memorized ones.
  • The paradox of memorizing speeches is that you need to memorize the speech without seeming like you did.

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The Sculpting Phase of a Speech

There are two ways you can write down your speech:

  1. How you want to say it;
  2. As an outline or a skeleton.

When you've written it down it's going to take more than several times to figure out what you're trying to say and this is the sculpting process where you edit, add, or delete parts of your speech to make it sound better.

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The Memorization Phase of a Speech

  • The key to memorizing a speech is to memorize it hierarchically. You begin with the broad chunks, moving to specific paragraphs, phrases, up until the intonation and your timing with the words.
  • When starting with the chunks you simply write out the main points of the speech then cover them up and recall them.
  • Moving up to the small points you can expand your bullets to represent each idea with one or two key words and quiz yourself until you have it memorized.

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The Delivery of a Speech

Now that you've written your speech down and practiced it more than a hundred times, you're about to go on stage to perform.

Remember the chunks you've written down and place your attention mostly on the things you want to say, because the how of the delivery will simple come out however you've practiced it most

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But you might meet peers and other people speaking in your native language, and if this bubble sticks, you can end up living in a country for decades without ever learning the local language.

Mastering Basic Phrases at Home First

To learn the basics, find a tool that fulfils the two basic requirements for memorizing: repetition and recall.

  • You need to practice saying something more than once to master it, and then it is best to space those times out over days or weeks.
  • Recalling phrases is less common, but it is vital. Find phrases, and practice saying it correctly.

Starting phrases include:

  • I would like...?
  • Where is ...?
  • How do you say ...?
  • What is that?
  • What is your name?
  • Where are you from?
  • What do you do for work?

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The brain is obsessed with unfinished tasks

The brain is obsessed with unfinished tasks

When we have unfinished tasks, we think about them continuously. But the moment they are completed, we forget about them. If we have unread email, we constantly wonder what it says. But once it...

Incomplete tasks: What happens inside the brain

Once our brain receives information, it temporarily stores sensory memory (sight, hearing, smells, taste, and touch). If we pay attention to the information, it moves to our short-term memories.

If the task is incomplete, our brains can't let it go until it's done. That is why TV dramas use cliffhangers to end episodes.

How to capitalize on the Zeigarnik effect

  • Reduce your tendency to procrastinate. If you have a task you've been avoiding, begin with the smallest thing to be done. The desire to close the loop will help you take small steps to get it done.
  • Get people to take note of what you're saying. Try using ellipses instead of a full stop in your headline so that your reader will feel like "there's more to this."
  • Memorize more information. Break your information up into parts. Or spread your learning over several days.
  • Remember difficult names. Learn one part of the name, then come back to the second part when your done memorizing the first.

A TED Talk is 18 minutes long

A TED Talk is 18 minutes long

TED curator Chris Anderson explains:
The 18-minute length works much like the way Twitter forces people to be disciplined in what they write. By forcing speakers who are u...

Give a TED-style talk that gets a lot of views

  • Arrange your message onto the 9-up format: same size as sticky notes, until you are happy with the flow.
  • Solicit feedback from effective presenters that you trust to give honest, unfiltered feedback on your narrative and slides.
  • Rehearse with a great (honest) communicator that is not afraid to speak up.
  • Articulate each point clearly.
  • Practice with a clock counting up the minutes, to know how much you're over. Then trim it down.
  • Once you're within the timeframe, practice with a clock counting down. Know where you should be at 6, 12 and 18 minutes.
  • Let your coach jot down what you say well and what you don’t.
  • Don’t be camera shy. Practice by videotaping yourself.
  • Do one more full timed rehearsal right before you walk on stage.
  • Pick two natural places you could stop in your talk, then demarcate those as possible endings.