The Delivery of a Speech - Deepstash

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How to Memorize a Speech | Scott H Young

The Delivery of a Speech

Now that you've written your speech down and practiced it more than a hundred times, you're about to go on stage to perform.

Remember the chunks you've written down and place your attention mostly on the things you want to say, because the how of the delivery will simple come out however you've practiced it most

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Mastering Basic Phrases at Home First

To learn the basics, find a tool that fulfils the two basic requirements for memorizing: repetition and recall.

  • You need to practice saying something more than once to master it, and then it is best to space those times out over days or weeks.
  • Recalling phrases is less common, but it is vital. Find phrases, and practice saying it correctly.

Starting phrases include:

  • I would like...?
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  • How do you say ...?
  • What is that?
  • What is your name?
  • Where are you from?
  • What do you do for work?
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