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The Myth of Creative Inspiration: Great Artists Don't Wait for Motivation

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The Myth of Creative Inspiration: Great Artists Don't Wait for Motivation
Franz Kafka is considered one of the most creative and influential writers of the 20th century, but he actually spent most of his time working as a lawyer for the Workers Accident Insurance Institute. How did Kafka produce such fantastic creative works while holding down his day job?

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How artists work

How artists work

The work of top creatives follows a consistent pattern and routine:

  • Maya Angelou would rent a local hotel to write, from 6:30 AM until 2 PM. She would never sleep at the hotel.

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The power in Scheduling

The power in Scheduling

If you’re serious about creating something, stop waiting for motivation and creative inspiration to strike you and simply set a schedule for doing work on a consistent basis.

You can’t...

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