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Understanding Different Negotiation Styles

https://www.pon.harvard.edu/daily/negotiation-skills-daily/understanding-different-negotiation-styles/

pon.harvard.edu

Understanding Different Negotiation Styles
In the business world, some negotiators always seem to get what they want, while others more often tend to come up short. What might make some people better negotiators than others? The answer may be in part that people bring different negotiation styles and strategies to the bargaining table, based on their different personalities, experiences, and beliefs about negotiating.

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4 basic negotiation styles

...depending on different social motives:

  • Individualists seek to maximize their own outcomes with little regard for their counterparts’ outcomes. .
  • Cooperators strive to maximize both their own and other parties’ outcomes and to see that resources are divided fairly.
  • Competitives seek to get a better deal than their “opponent.” They behave in a self-serving manner and often lack the trust needed to solve problems jointly.
  • Altruists, who are quite rare, put their counterpart’s needs and wants above their own.

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