Can light melt atoms into goo? - Deepstash
CERN sees evidence of quark-gluon plasma during collision

Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider have recently studied how, imbued with enough energy, photons can bounce off of one another like massive particles do. Scientists at the LHC...

1

STASHED IN:

5

Can light melt atoms into goo?

symmetrymagazine.org

STASHED IN:

0 Comments

Stimulated Quark-Gluon Plasma Formation

Although they have known for years they could produce small amounts of quark-gluon plasma in collisions between heavy ions, this is the first time scientists have reported possible evidence...

STASHED IN:

4

The Large Light Collider

They went looking for collisions between photons and nuclei, called photonuclear collisions, in data collected during the lead-ion runs at the LHC. These runs have happened in the ...

1

STASHED IN:

5

The Photons Having A Moment

When two lead nuclei collide at high energy inside the LHC, the gluons can lose their grip, causing the protons and neutrons to melt and merge into a quark-gluon plasma. The now-free quarks...

1

STASHED IN:

6

A Trigger That Picks Out The Photon-Zapped Lead Ions

During the lead-ion runs at the LHC, nuclei aren’t the only things colliding. Because they have a positive charge, lead nuclei carry strong electromagnetic fields that grow in intensity as they acc...

1

STASHED IN:

5

The Trigger

Luckily, photonuclear collisions have a special asymmetrical shape due to the momentum differences between the tiny photon and the massive lead ion: “It’s like a truck hitting a trash can,” Seidlit...

1

STASHED IN:

5

Recognizable Particle-flow

After collecting and analyzing the data, Seidlitz, Perepelitsa and their colleagues saw a particle-flow signature characteristic of a quark-gluon plasma. 

The finding al...

1

STASHED IN:

5

The Original Discovery

Perepelitsa and his colleagues are dubious that a massless photon could pack a powerful enough punch to melt part of a lead nucleus, which contains 82 protons and 126 neutrons...

1

STASHED IN:

5

A Quantum Transformation

It was the positron, the first predicted particle of antimatter. In 1932, Caltech physicist Carl Anderson discovered the particle, and later physicists spotted the annihila...

1

STASHED IN:

5

Bullet Over A Bowling Ball

Perepelitsa and his colleagues suspect that the collisions they’ve observed, in which photons appear to be colliding with lead nuclei and creating a small amount of quark-gluon plasma, are ...

1

STASHED IN:

5

The Smallest Drop

For now, the exact mechanism that may be causing this quark-gluon plasma signature within photonuclear collisions remains a mystery. Whatever is going on, Noronha-Hostler says...

STASHED IN:

5

Conclusion

"We're pushing to the most extremes in fluid dynamics,” Noronha-Hostler says. “Not only do we have something that is moving at the speed of light and at the highest temperatures kn...

1

STASHED IN:

5

Deepstash helps you become inspired, wiser and productive, through bite-sized ideas from the best articles, books and videos out there.

GET THE APP: