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Adhesive Labels Help Critical Thinking Stick

https://www.thoughtco.com/make-mind-maps-that-stick-with-labels-8028

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Adhesive Labels Help Critical Thinking Stick
Adhesive address or shipping labels come in a variety of shapes and sizes, which makes them ideal for a variety of activities in the classroom. One way to use labels to encourage critical thinking in the classroom is to have students use labels printed with ideas or topics from a unit of study in order to create mind-maps or diagrams that visually organize information on a topic.

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The Mind Map

The Mind Map

It's an interdisciplinary strategy where a student or group build(s) of a single concept or idea: a drama, an element in chemistry, a biography, a vocabulary word, an event in history, a commercial product.

The concept or idea is placed in the center of a blank sheet of paper and representations of other ideas are connected to that central concept are added, branching out in all directions on the page.

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Using labels in Mind Mapping

Using labels in Mind Mapping
Teachers can use mind-maps as a review exercise, a formative assessment, or an interim assessment tool, by providing students individually or in groups with printed labels and asking students to organize the information in a way that shows relationships.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The Outline/List

Is a linear method of taking notes that proceeds down the page, using indentation or bullets to denote major and minor points.

Pros: it records content relationship in a way tha...

The Sentence Method

The goal is to jot down your thoughts as quickly as possible. Format is kept to a minimum: every new thought is written on a new line. 

Pros: Is like free writing for notes.

Cons: lack organization and notes can be hard to understand.

Works for: meetings or lectures that lack organization; when information is presented very quickly.

SQ3R (Survey, Question, Read, Recite, Review)

  • Skim the material for bolded text, images, summaries, to produce a list of headlines;
  • Each headline is then written in the form of a question;
  • Record your “answers” to the reading questions under each corresponding header;
  • Once you’ve finished reading the text, write a summary of the material from memory—this is the “recite” part of the process. 
  • Finally, review your notes to make sure you’ve completely grasped the concepts.

Works for: dense written material.

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Tony Buzan -Inventor of Mindmapping

Normal linear note-taking and writing will put you into a semi-hypnotic trance, while mind mapping ..."

Tony Buzan -Inventor of Mindmapping

Blank mind map template

This is the default starting point for any mindmap.

Simple mind map template

Mind maps can become quite expansive and elaborate. To simplify, start with a simple mind map template.

The Outline method

The Outline method

It requires you to structure your notes in form of an outline by using bullet points to represent different topics and their subtopics. 

Start writing main topics on the far left ...

The Cornell Method

  • The page is divided into 3 or 4 sections (top for title and, bottom for summary, 2 columns in the center).  
  • 30% of width should be kept in the left column while the remaining 70% for the right column.
  • All notes go into the main note-taking column
  • The smaller column on the left side is for comments, questions or hints about the actual notes. 

The Boxing Method

All notes that are related to each other are grouped together in a box. 

A dedicated box is assigned for each section of notes which cuts down the time needed for reading and reviewing.

Apps are especially helpful for this method because content on the page can be reordered or resized subsequently.