Change Your Bedtime - Deepstash

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7 Surprising Things That Can Help You Stop Worrying

Change Your Bedtime

Those who go to bed very late and sleep for short amounts of time are more overwhelmed with negative.
Late sleepers tend to worry about the future and dwell over past events, and they have a higher risk of anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

4-7-8 Breathing
Created by Dr. Andrew Weil this is breathing exercise to help you relax: 
  1. First, let your lips part. Exhaling completely through your mouth.
  2. Next, close your lips, inhaling sil...
Establish what you can control

Recognize that in most situations, all you can control is your effort and your attitude. 

When you put your energy into the things you can control, you'll be much more effective.

Your influence

You can influence people and circumstances, but you can't force things to go your way:

  • To have the most influence, focus on changing your behavior. Be a good role model and set healthy boundaries for yourself.
  • When you have concerns about someone else's choices, share your opinion, but only share it once. Don't try to fix people who don't want to be fixed.
Identify your fears

Think about what you could do when failure happens.

Usually, the worst-case scenario isn't as tragic as you might envision. Acknowledging that you can handle the worst-case scenario can help you put your energy into more productive exercises.

Breathing and anxiety
Breathing and anxiety

We have become pretty bad at the most basic act of living: breathing. We breathe through our mouths and into our chests, and we do it way too fast.

Besides the health prob...

How breathing can calm us

Instead of trying to think yourself out of feeling anxious, you can do something more specific: breathe slow or fast, in a particular rhythm, or through a nostril; this can work as an instant relief.

A regular breathing practice will help you feel calmer in daily situations, but studies suggest that focusing on your breathing in moments of acute stress could also be useful.

Breathing: stress vs relaxation

The way we breathe can set off a cascade of physical changes in the body that promote either stress or relaxation.

Breathing impacts the sympathetic (“fight or flight”) and parasympathetic (“rest and digest”) branches of our nervous system, and certain techniques can promote more parasympathetic calm and relaxation. Some may also cause us to release hormones like prolactin and possibly oxytocin, the feel-good hormone of love and bonding.