Guilt is an informative emotion - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Why not working makes us feel guilty | A Life of Productivity

Guilt is an informative emotion

Guilt is an informative emotion

It’s often a sign we’re not acting in accordance with our values.

The guilt of not working stems from two places: 

  • From the fact that we value working hard
  • We consider the opportunity cost of our actions whenever we’re not working—what we could be doing instead of what we are doing. 
Don’t let this guilt of not working prevent you from taking a much needed break.

75 SAVES

158 READS

EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Switch or change workplaces

People get tired of their surroundings and a spruce-up can boost their energy and creativity. 

Moving furniture or going to a fresh place can help your productivity.

Plan ahead when energized

Plan ahead for the week, month or year when you are energized and feeling motivated, for better results for getting stuff done.

Minimize distractions

Minimizing or removing distractions is a great way to keep your productivity high, and it goes beyond just smartphones. 

The root cause is our emotional discomfort and a need to be distracted.

Plan your day calendar reflecting your values, and stay on the tasks at hand.

Really see each other

Making eye contact with someone can relieve stress and create a deeper sense of connection. 

Even making eye contact with a stranger can soften your heart.

Listen with all of your senses

When you talk with someone in person, notice the posture and body language of the other person. Focus on the tone in their voice. Consider the meaning of their words.

Reach out and touch someone

Touch is a way we communicate and essential to our development. Touch makes us feel safe and encourage trust, love, and compassion.

Reach out to your loved ones and see if you notice a difference.

New Year's resolutions fail
New Year's resolutions fail

80% of New Year’s resolutions are broken within two months.

And these tend to concern habits or behaviors we are actually determined to change. So much so that they are often recycled ...

Going against our nature

Change is easier when we play our strenghts, but is going to be hardest when we are not committed and when it involves going against our nature. 

A hack that promises to help us can’t when it depends on us having to unlearn our deep-rooted patterns of adapting. That’s why playing to our strengths is much easier, to the point of not requiring much effort at all.

Wanting change vs. wanting to change

Most people don't really want to change, they want to have changed.

When people profess a clear desire to change, that usually means they are interested in change as an outcome rather than change as a process.