The Reverse Ben Franklin Effect - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Get an account to save ideas & make your own & organize them how you wish.

deepstash

Beta

The Ben Franklin effect - Quartz Obsession

The Reverse Ben Franklin Effect

Research indicates that the meaner you are to someone, the more you’ll dislike them—even without real cause.

This reverse Ben Franklin effect may help explain how soldiers are able to kill enemies, why prison staff can become needlessly cruel to inmates, and generational feuds.

47 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

The Ben Franklin effect - Quartz Obsession

The Ben Franklin effect - Quartz Obsession

https://qz.com/emails/quartz-obsession/1603343/

qz.com

3

Key Ideas

The Reverse Ben Franklin Effect

Research indicates that the meaner you are to someone, the more you’ll dislike them—even without real cause.

This reverse Ben Franklin effect may help explain how soldiers are able to kill enemies, why prison staff can become needlessly cruel to inmates, and generational feuds.

The Ben Franklin Effect Mechanism

Most believe that this effect results from cognitive dissonance - when a behavior (helping someone) contradicts our beliefs (disliking the helped one). 

To lessen the unpleasantness of the contradiction, our brains think that we may like that person.

The Ben Franklin Effect

It happens when asking someone for a favor makes them like you more. 

This is believed to work because our brains try to solve the dissonance between helping someone and not being interested in their well-being by liking them.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Leaders in a time of crisis
Leaders in a time of crisis

As a leader, when facing a crisis, you have to adopt the best position in order to ensure the efficiency of your action. And, most importantly, this action has to be taken as fast as possible. ...

The “First 15 Minutes” checklist

The “First 15 Minutes” crisis management checklist:

  • focus on the current matter.
  • become the trusted voice in this crisis. Designate a crisis team.
  • monitor in real-time what the media has to say on the topic.
  • get a deeper understanding of the scope of the issue and the vital decisions to be made.
  • prepare an initial 'holding statement' in order to make your opinion pubic. Make sure the statement goes viral fast.
  • document well before speaking publicly. 
  • show humanity, compassion, and concern for any human toll – and mean it. 

  • follow up on everything that you have engaged yourself to fulfill.
Don'ts for times of crisis

Dealing with a crisis increases the risk of taking bad decisions. When times get harder:

  • don't lie, minimize the situation or make jokes regarding the crisis.
  • don't run away from your responsibilities.
  • don't hurry to issue a denial unless you have all the facts.
  • make positive statements when talking about the matter, rather than negative ones.
  • don’t let your fears of liability trump your humanity.
  • don’t speculate until you fully understand the situation.
Doomscrolling
Doomscrolling

This is a term that describes the habit of endlessly scrolling social media and news feeds full of doom and gloom on one’s smartphone screen, something which is eroding our mental health.

The Threat Cycle

One feels anxious and wants to hook the mind back to the doom and threat cycle, to gather more information.

The more time we spend doomscrolling, the more dangers and threats we stumble upon, skewing our perspective of the outside world.

Ways To Temper The Doom
  1. Set A Timer: Your social media and news feeds can be timed using the built-in utilities of the smartphone that shut off the app for the day after a certain time.
  2. Stay On Focus: Stay aware while you fire up your smartphone for what you are looking for, and refrain yourself from getting distracted towards the assortment of notifications and enticing app icons.
  3. Positive Emotions: Instead of focussing on ‘doom and gloom’, try to default towards the good, like connecting with friends and loved ones, or reading something that makes you laugh, and sending it to friends.
Checking Email
Check email only at set points during the day. 
  • you may decide that you'll only check your email before lunch, and at the end of the day.
  • you can also reserve time to re...
Checking your email regularly...

... during the day can be an effective way to keep your inbox at manageable levels.

However, the constant interruption and distraction that comes from it can dramatically lower your productivity, and disrupt your ability to enter a state of flow when working on high value projects.

Reading Email
  • Try using the "Two-Minute Rule" when you read your mail: if the email will take less than two minutes to read and reply to, then take care of it right now, even if it's not a high priority.
  • For emails that will take longer than two minutes to read or respond to, schedule time on your calendar, or add this as an action on your To-Do List , to do later. 

5 more ideas

The email hibernation experiment

The email experiment works as follows:

  • No logging in to any primary email accounts for the entire month.
  • Setting up automatic forwarding to an assistant to ensure nothing urge...
Email is addictive

According to a 2018 survey, the average creative professional spends 5.6 hours per day checking email.

Once you make up your mind to make the mail app less accessible, it is much easier to give up email. Leave the phone outside the bedroom to help build resilience to the email habit.

Most emails aren't important

Most emails are of little value. We often remember the extraordinary, like the once-in-a-lifetime invitation, but not the ordinary - that possibly only three percent of emails are worth reading.

4 more ideas

Coworkers That Cause Drama

When you're second-guessing yourself before communicating with someone, you probably have reservations based on their past reactions. 

When you do need to communicate with such people,...

Don't Pretend to Be Above Office Politics

You work with a variety of people and you won't always get along with everyone. Telling yourself, "I don't engage in office politics, I tell it like it is," is a flawed tactic that might just cause more trouble.

When you stick your foot in your mouth, all you can do is apologize and explain it was a genuine mistake.

Ask Questions

Ask your contacts in any new environment.

  • Are there sensitive topics that I shouldn't discuss without talking to you first?
  • Can you draw an organizational chart for me?
  • Who should my main point of contact be for this project?
  • Is there a certain process I should follow for this task? Is it okay if I talk to this person first?
  • With whom should I be engaging?

With a clear understanding of how they work and are their organizational hierarchy, you're less likely to do something that will cause unnecessary drama or miscommunication.

4 more ideas

Minimizing The Brain Drain Caused By Your Devices
  • Whether you are using it or not, be aware of how much of your conscious thoughts are occupied by your devices.
  • Take your devices out of your sight and keep it...
Phones And The Human Brain

Phones take over many duties in our day-to-day lives and so they occupy portions of our attentional capacity.

Studies indicate that regular phone and computer users that physically get away from devices, theirs or not, have an increase in available cognitive capacity and that doing so is the best way to make sure you won’t have anxiety over whatever you might be missing on it.

Adopt GTD Methodology in Email

think of every email you get as either something you need to take action on, track, or refer to later. 

Every time you open a conversation, decide right away what to do with it. D...

Create an Email Productivity System

There’s no “definitive” system. The best framework is the one that works for you. Ideally, it should model your work style, supporting the way you work. Bonus points if it’s low-maintenance, fast to set up, and adaptable as your work changes.

Some people like to use folders with specific actions (do, delegate, reply), while others prefer the deadline-driven approach (today, tomorrow, next week).

Power Up Your Email with Plugins

Some examples:

  • Undo Send: for when you accidentally press the send button.
  • Canned Responses: create a template that you can reuse with canned responses.
  • Send and Archive: Automatically archive an email after replying to it using the send and archive button.

6 more ideas

Organize your emails

Create the following 2 folders:

  • Require Action besides simply responding.
  • Require Response. File emails here that you are unable to respond to immediat...
Unsubscribe

Unsubscribe from every list that doesn’t offer solid value for your business.

Turn off email notifications

Interrupting a task with notifications leads to a loss of concentration and a decline in productivity levels.

Feel free to set up an autoresponder re-directing all urgent matters to your phone.

5 more ideas