Identifying the hardest-hit

Identifying the hardest-hit

People whose self-esteem is lower will experience rejection as more painful, and it'll take them a little longer to get over it. Those who have higher self-esteem -- but who aren't narcissists -- tend to be more resilient.

Rejection-sensitive people might think about 'How can I get myself out of this situation?' or how to avoid a situation altogether.

@vihadas

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Self Improvement

MORE IDEAS FROM THE ARTICLE

Don't become sensitive to rejection
Many times the rejection does 50 percent of the damage and we do the other 50 percent of the damage. 

We start with this high volume of negative self-talk and criticism that takes the rejection to another level.

Rejection hurts

Humans are social animals -- which makes rejection all the more emotionally painful.

Anything that keeps us out of the group in an overt way, we're going to have a hard time with. It's an important aspect of who we are.

Do not let it bother you in the first place, and then minimizing its effects after it's wreaked its havoc.

  • Build resilience. Remind yourself of your qualities and worth. 
  • Remind yourself of how much you are loved by having friends come over who value and care about you.
  • It's not always about you. Think about what might be going on for the other person. 
  • People change their reactions based on your behavior toward them.
  • Find someone you can trust to serve as a sounding board can help you gain perspective. 

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RELATED IDEAS

Friendship breakups can hurt more than romantic ones. It is necessary to realise that friends come and go. You can use it as an opportunity to ask yourself if this is the type of person you want to be friends with.

After some time has passed and you find yourself missing that friendship, reach out to see if the person wants to get together. Allowing some time to pass can help people approach a friendship with a new perspective.

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IDEAS

Acknowledging Emotions

Trying to minimize the pain by convincing yourself—or someone else—it was “no big deal” will only prolong your pain. The best way to deal with uncomfortable emotions is to face them head-on.

Admit when you're embarrassed, sad, disappointed, or discouraged. Be confident in your ability to cope with discomfort in a healthy manner.

Mentally strong people ask themselves, "What did I gain from this?" so they can learn from rejection. With each rejection, they grow stronger and become better.

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