Effects Of Stress In The Workplace - Deepstash

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Decrease Your Stress by Letting Your Team Share the Weight

Effects Of Stress In The Workplace

  • Poor physical health
  • Personal avoidance
  • A decrease in information sharing
  • Bad mouthing the company
  • Quitting
  • Excessive defensiveness
  • Social conflicts 

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Decrease Your Stress by Letting Your Team Share the Weight

Decrease Your Stress by Letting Your Team Share the Weight

https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/293733

entrepreneur.com

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Key Ideas

Questions To Help You Delegate

  • As a manager, what tasks am I doing that I was doing before my promotion?
  • What tasks would I delegate to a member of an ideal team?
  • What team members have the capacity to learn how to do these tasks?
  • How can I pass my knowledge along to others to prepare them for these tasks?

Effects Of Stress In The Workplace

  • Poor physical health
  • Personal avoidance
  • A decrease in information sharing
  • Bad mouthing the company
  • Quitting
  • Excessive defensiveness
  • Social conflicts 

How To Decrease a Manager’s Stress

  • Being vulnerable
  • Delegating
  • Having clear goals and evaluation parameters

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