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These 5 Speaking Habits Make People Want To Collaborate With You

Limit First-Person Pronouns

When you’re trying to sound collaborative and inclusive, you need to keep “I,” “me,” and “mine” to a minimum.

Emphasize the team with statements like  “we did this” or “our team achieved that.”

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These 5 Speaking Habits Make People Want To Collaborate With You

These 5 Speaking Habits Make People Want To Collaborate With You

https://www.fastcompany.com/40546622/these-5-speaking-habits-make-people-want-to-collaborate-with-you

fastcompany.com

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Key Ideas

Limit First-Person Pronouns

When you’re trying to sound collaborative and inclusive, you need to keep “I,” “me,” and “mine” to a minimum.

Emphasize the team with statements like  “we did this” or “our team achieved that.”

Nix The Negatives

Negative like “I can’t”  or “I won’t” distance you from teammates and give the impression that you’re in opposition to someone or something.

Try to propose an alternative or at least soften your phrasing.

Mention A Shared Goal

Speak in terms of common objectives.

People who are good at making others want to work with them tend to continuously reemphasize the goals and outcomes they share with their team.

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