The information hoarder - Deepstash

The information hoarder

The info hoarders pride themselves on knowing critical information but with no intention of sharing it to advance team initiatives. The lack of information sharing impacts the decision-making process and increases the duplication of efforts.

It's vital to ensure the team operates with a spirit of inclusion, sharing resources and other valuable information.

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MORE IDEAS FROM Building a Team? Avoid These 5 Team Killers

Building a team is a skill

The stages of team development:

  • Forming: This is when teams come together. They are excited and want to learn from each other.
  • Storming: The team starts to feel some friction, people are less polite and may experience disagreement as they consider how they'll function.
  • Norming: People settle down, and expectations align.
  • Performing: The team has adjusted. Goals, objectives, work styles and personalities are understood.

The ideal team is the right mix of talent, motivation, trust and alignment to achieve the objectives required. However, care should be taken to avoid some major derailers.

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A gossiper on the team can impact the team. People talking behind the back of others and stirring up trouble can affect morale, team cohesion and cause unnecessary drama.

As a leader, you'll have to deal with complaints, hurt feelings and workplace toxicity. Proactively stop a gossiper by emphasising the importance of professionalism and focusing on verified data.

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The brilliant jerk is talented and intelligent, but equally disagreeable and abrasive.

The value of the brilliant jerk is lessened because they are disliked and few can work with them. The team fail to meet goals and objectives and you have to become a team referee. It is seldom worth trading intelligence and talent for the team's overall mission.

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The laggard is the person who never contributes but wants the credit. Left unchecked, the dawdler can create resentment, cause burnout and workload imbalance.

If you have a chronic laggard, you need to find a way to help them rise to their potential or consider parting ways.

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The interrupter talks over people, hijacks meetings, take too much time sharing their thoughts so that others can't share theirs. The interruptions can interfere with the creativity of the group.

A leader should set the tone and show that listening is equally important. Leaders can moderate the interruptions in the following ways:

  • Setting a meeting agenda
  • Appointing a rotating team member to run the meeting
  • Asking everyone's opinion
  • Providing feedback to the interrupter about their bent to monopolise conversations

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RELATED IDEA

Top performers look beyond their assigned role

They look broadly to do the job that needs to be done. They build a reputation of being a flexible utility player, with the agility to adapt to changing needs.

One of the best ways to encourage this is to be a good communicator, both by letting people know what is happening, and really listening to other people.

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Establish the mindset that change is good

Because change often leads to a crisis, you and your team can easily see it as a negative, and approach it with fear. Yet if you think back to when your business started, you capitalized on change as your opportunity.

That's the model you need to project to your team daily, and remind yourself regularly.

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It's not about the argument

It's not the disagreement that is the problem, but its impact on the workplace that must be managed. When channeled correctly, differing opinions can bring about positive change and new ideas.

When employees are engaged in a conflict, don't take sides or assume that the dispute must be brought to an end fast. Employees don't always have to agree with each other. Healthy disagreement should be expected and even encouraged, provided those involved are not rude or disrespectful. 

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