Considerations For Zen Practice - Deepstash
Considerations For Zen Practice

Considerations For Zen Practice

  • Understand that nothing is grasped or gained from life. To succeed is to fail, as the more one succeeds, the greater the need to go on succeeding. 
  • There is no “myself” apart from the mind-body which gives structure to our experience.
  • There is never anything but the present, and if one cannot live there, one cannot live anywhere.
  • Zen practice must not have a goal. To have an eye on some end is to have a lack of concentration, lack of sincerity.

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MORE IDEAS FROM The Way of Zen by Alan Watts: Summary, Notes, and Lessons - Nat Eliason

Of Zen And Focus

Zen spirituality is to be in the moment and do only what you are doing without giving in to fleeting thoughts.

When a human is so self-controlled, that he cannot let go of himself, he dithers or wobbles between opposites. The effort to remain “good” or “happy” necessitates such strenuous balancing that it will surely induce mania and anxiety.

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Satori And The Koan
  • Satori, enlightenment, is not a sudden complete awakening, it is the sudden and intuitive way of seeing into anything. The satori is not a feeling of relaxation, though, it is letting go but not feeling it.
  • The koan is a way of stressing the mind into having to relax and release itself. Like increasing muscular tension to give yourself a feeling of what not to do. 

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Zen In The Arts

Zen has no goal. A world that focuses on destinations, that only cares about getting somewhere as fast as possible, becomes a world without substance.

Zen is a liberation from time. If we open our eyes and see clearly, it becomes obvious that there is no other time than this instant, and that the past and future are abstractions without any concrete reality.

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The Zen View Of Morals

Evil cannot be destroyed, any more than good can, because they are polar opposites of the same thing. Destruction and creation, chaos and order; opposite aspects of reality, in tension with one another, are necessary to keep the whole going: the unity of opposites.

Zen makes no judgment about good or bad besides saying both are necessary to make the universe dynamic. Zen has no particular moral code and The Noble Truths are not moral teachings.

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What Is Zen

Zen is not a moral teaching, and as it is without dogma, it does not require one to believe in anything. A true spiritual path does not tell people what to believe in; rather it shows them how to think; or, in the case of Zen - what not to think.

Zen Buddhism, like a taste or a smell, is a practice that needs to be experienced, not a concept to understand.

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The History Of Zen
  • 1500 years ago, the founding of the the Ch’an (Zen) school
  • 12th century C. E. , the concept arrives in Japan
  • 1, 300 years ago Zen reaches Korea and Vietnam.
  • Late 19th century, it reaches Europe and North America.
Each country has established its own definitions and practices, but all are based on the original ideas of the Ch’an School, which is why the most colloquial term around the world for following a Zen lifestyle is “Zen Buddhism”.

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