The Reward Of Positive Emotions Give Sense Of Meaning - Deepstash
The Reward Of Positive Emotions Give Sense Of Meaning

The Reward Of Positive Emotions Give Sense Of Meaning

Contrary to our usual conceptions of using one’s “skills to the utmost,” Csikszentmihalyi tells us that the reward for entering such a state is not the material benefits it generates, but the positive emotions.

These, as Einstein theorized, not only motivate us to become better, but they also provide a source of meaning no amount of financial gain above a minimum level can offer.

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Flow is indeed a lovely state to be in. Sharing this here as a reminder to self and to everyone else too.

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MORE IDEAS FROM Albert Einstein Tells His Son The Key to Learning & Happiness is Losing Yourself in Creativity (or “Finding Flow”)

Do What You Love, The Way You Like To Do It

Einstein understood the value of developing an informal avocation. “Mainly play the things on the piano which please you,” he tells his son, “even if the teacher does not assign those.”

Doing what you love, the way you like to do it, he goes on, “is the way to learn the most, that when you are doing something with such enjoyment that you don’t notice that the time passes."

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Do What We Love To The Best Of Our Abilities For Sheer Pleasure

“The lack of basic material resources contributes to unhappiness,” Csikszentmihalyi’s data demonstrates, “but the increase in material resources does not increase happiness.”

While none of us can be Einstein, Csikszentmihalyi tells us we can all benefit from Einstein’s advice, by doing whatever we do to the best of our abilities and without any motive other than sheer pleasure.

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Creative Immersion, Flow ~ Human Flourishing

Csikszentmihalyi’s insights into human flourishing mirror Einstein’s: he calls such creative immersion “flow,” or the state of “being completely involved in an activity for its own sake.

"The ego falls away. Time flies. Every action, movement, and thought follows inevitably from the previous one, like playing jazz. Your whole being is involved, and you’re using your skills to the utmost." - Csikszentmihalyi

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RELATED IDEA

Imagination is more important than knowledge.

Einstein explained how he often knew that he was right without knowing why. He shared that it’s his intuition telling him that he must be right with an assumption.

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Combinatory Play

We’ve all experienced that flash of insight, that fleeting moment when a solution we’ve been grinding away at reveals itself in an unexpected place.

Einstein, for example, was known to play violin whenever he was stuck on a tough problem and often spoke of how music influenced the way he thought about math and science.

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Ancient ideas about light

Pythagoras, Euclid and Ptolemy thought that light moved in straight lines. They also believed the eye emitted visual rays, like feelers, that touched the object and created the sensation of sight.

  • If you drop a needle, it takes a while before you spot it. In the 3rd Century BC, Euclid thought that this delay in vision is caused by the visual ray that is yet to touch the object.
  • The idea was rejected by Ptolemy the Second in the 10th Century. He thought something emitted by an object (like the sun) must have entered the eye.

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