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Perfection Paralysis: How To Step Back And Stop Overanalyzing Your Work

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"(...) The truth is you are probably your own worst critic. Take a step back and get some feedback from a senior leader in your organization. If they think your work is good, push through and recognize your value." - Kiki Ramsey, Kiki Ramsey International

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Perfection Paralysis: How To Step Back And Stop Overanalyzing Your Work

Perfection Paralysis: How To Step Back And Stop Overanalyzing Your Work

https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbescoachescouncil/2018/05/02/perfection-paralysis-how-to-step-back-and-stop-overanalyzing-your-work/

forbes.com

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Key Ideas

Consider Your Constraints

"In the business world, decisions need to be made in a certain time with a certain budget. Remember your work is not about being perfect, but providing the best insight you can within the constraints you have. That gives you a lot of room to work and permission to not be perfect." - Larry Boyer, Success Rockets LLC

Take Small Steps

"Find what is the smallest and most important thing to work on, get feedback, and keep iterating. Focus on who is impacted by your work and engaged them often. It's a journey." - Alan Trivedi, Trivedi Coaching & Consulting Group

Define And Visualize Success

"Reflect and visualize what success looks like. What are you trying to solve for? Jot it down on paper and compare your work objectively to this success criteria. Work with a trusted colleague if it helps bring clarity." - Christie Lindor, The MECE Muse

Strive Toward 'Best For Now'

"It's easy to get bogged down with a strive for perfection in one's work. One solution I have is to accept a 'best for now' version. Given time constraints for many projects, it allows me to step back from a project, and know that it is at its best for the time being. If I look at it later and see room for improvement, I can create an updated version."- Billy Williams, Archegos

The Measure Of Success

"I'm a recovering perfectionist, so I ask what is the goal and what does 'good enough' look like for each task on my list. Then, I rate the importance of the task on a scale from 0 to 10, with 10 being the highest. Now, you have a measure of success and an idea of how to achieve it." - Rosie Guagliardo, InnerBrilliance Coaching

Celebrate Small And Large Wins

"When you are clear about your desired outcome, you then get to choose to enjoy the journey to your success destination. The best way to do this is to celebrate the small and large wins along the way (...) " - Lisa Marie Platske, Upside Thinking, Inc.

Seek Mentorship

"... mentorship provides perspective, a point of view that may help you not beat yourself up and give you a better understanding of where you are so you are not caught in a mental overanalysis game." - John M. O'Connor, Career Pro Inc.

Assess Your Impact

"(...)Take time to assess the outcome or results of your work, not just the actions you've taken... When you see you've had a positive effect and can label your accomplishment, you may be able to stop overanalyzing and move on." - Beth Kuhel, Get Hired, LLC

Set An Action Deadline

"It’s always critical to carefully analyze important decisions, but over-analyzing is a big risk too. In many cases, inaction is the worst possible action. Set an action deadline at the beginning of any important project -- one that allows sufficient analysis, but also maintains momentum. It’s a great way to avoid paralysis-by-analysis, and make sure you stay effective." - Gerry Valentine, Gerry Valentine

Get Outside Feedback

"(...) The truth is you are probably your own worst critic. Take a step back and get some feedback from a senior leader in your organization. If they think your work is good, push through and recognize your value." - Kiki Ramsey, Kiki Ramsey International

Fully Understand The Expectations

"To minimize over-analysis, understand what the expectations are. What exactly is the information you need to provide or deliverables that you need to meet? Are you overproducing? We are often our own worst enemy. Those who are consistent overachievers sometimes struggle with deadlines by becoming mired in too much detail (...)" - Erin Urban, UPPSolutions, LLC

A 'Recover And Release' Mindset

"The recover mindset happens after you complete your work and you review it for errors and realistic value. Once corrections are made, move into the release stage, where you let it go and are OK with what results from it. Your realistic view of its value will be the reminder you need to draw from to free yourself from continuing to overanalyze." - Lisa Guice, Lisa Guice Global-Vision, LLC

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