We're bad at predicting our feelings

The main barriers to accurate affective forecasting:

  • Impact Bias: Your tendency to overestimate the intensity and duration of future emotions. 
  • Projection Bias: However you feel in the present, you tend to project that onto the future. 
  • Focalism: When picturing an event in the future, you tend to focus only on that event, to the exclusion of everything else that may happen.

@conh359

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Problem Solving

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It refers to how we predict our future emotions and how certain life events will affect them.

We’re generally pretty bad at it—and that impacts our productivity, our goal setting, and our overall happiness

Our ability to look into the future and think about what will make us most happy is the way that we get to a present that pleases us.

Affective forecasting is forcing you to view your goals through the lens of what you really want, what will make you happy, and how achieving those goals will make you feel.

It’s a practice that helps you confront peer pressure, other people’s expectations and learned behaviors.

  1. Understand the things that stand between your present self and your future self. That includes those natural biases, but it also includes situations and events you just can’t predict.
  2. Use mindfulness to get in touch with your emotions, to recognize and understand them, without being consumed by them.
  3. Consider outside forces and their effects.

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The Fresh Start Effect

During the new year, our birthday or even the start of a school year, most of us have a feeling of a fresh start, a new beginning.

These 'fresh start' moments provide us with a temporary motivation to pursue our goals.

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IDEAS

50-10-40% formula

Only 10% of our happiness is determined by our circumstances, while 40% of our happiness is determined by our everyday thoughts and behavior and 50% of our happiness is genetically determined. So, if being happy once we achieve that major milestone only accounts for 10% of happiness, thinking you’ll be happy when you achieve that big goal just isn’t going to cut it. 

  • When we have a decision to make, it is recommended to solicit the views of people who have had the experience you're considering.
  • We can also ask the opinions of those around us since people tend to take a longer-term view when thinking about other people's choices.
  • The kind of questions we ask is also important. Instead of asking if you should take the new job, ask what they think your day-to-day life will be like if you take it.

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