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Are These Defense Mechanisms Preventing You From Being Productive?

Avoidance

Mechanism motto: I’m going to stay as far away from that stressful thing as possible.

The problem with avoidance: Things don’t go away just because you ignore them. That assignment will still need to get done. That conflict with that co-worker will need to be resolved eventually.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Are These Defense Mechanisms Preventing You From Being Productive?

Are These Defense Mechanisms Preventing You From Being Productive?

https://blog.trello.com/common-defense-mechanisms-preventing-productivity

blog.trello.com

6

Key Ideas

Defense Mechanisms

Our defense mechanisms really kick into high gear during situations where we feel threatened. That doesn’t necessarily mean physically threatened, but also in high-stress environments where we doubt our abilities and suddenly become hyper-aware of our own shortcomings. 

They are normal, but shouldn't be used to the extreme.

Denial

Mechanism motto: There’s no way that’s going to happen.

The problem with denial: Denial is more than just avoiding a potentially threatening thought or circumstance—it involves vehemently denying the fact that it even exists. It blinds you with unrealistic optimism.

Rationalization

Mechanism motto: That wasn’t my fault because...

The problem with rationalization: It involved the blame game. Taking an honest look at your own faults and acknowledging how you’ve contributed to your downfall is never easy.

Displacement

Mechanism motto: I need to find an unsuspecting target for my negative emotions.

The problem with displacement: You’ll channel all of your frustration and negative emotions into the totally wrong target. Anyone who crosses your path is going to wish they hadn’t.

Other defense mechanisms

  • Regression: Reverting to childlike behaviors.
  • Compartmentalization: Segregating different thoughts or portions of your life (i.e. shutting out any personal problems while you’re at work).
  • Projection: Assigning your own thoughts and emotions to others.
  • Undoing: Attempting to backpedal a negative behavior with a lot of positives.

EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Repression as a defense mechanism
Repression as a defense mechanism

Repression can best be defined as the psychological defense mechanism that involves pushing undesired thoughts into the unconscious in order to not think about them anymore.

...
Types of repression

Repression is of two types: primary and proper.

While the primary one takes into account the fact of hiding undesired thoughts or facts, the proper one takes place whenever an individual becomes aware of the thoughts that had initially been hidden and tries to hide them again.

Repression and its way of functioning

The objective of hiding our undesired thoughts in our unconsciousness is to feel less anxious.

However, Freud stated that this process can backfire at any point, as these hidden thoughts or feelings can still create anxiety, eventually leading to psychological distress.

3 more ideas

Excuse-making

It's a defense mechanism you use in the battle between your positive self-identity and the common challenges of everyday life.

This habit comes down to an inherent need to protect your...

The self-serving bias

It encourages you to claim your successes and to deflect your failures.

When something good happens, you take the credit, but when something bad happens, you blame it on something out of your control.

Common types of excuses
  • Lies: This is one of the worst types of excuses—a straight-up lie.
  • Self-handicapping excuses: Such as “I don’t have the skills to do that”, or “That’s not my job.”
  • Blame-shifting excuses: Instead of putting the blame on your lack of abilities, you accuse external factors for your missteps or lack of performance.

one more idea

Your brain is the biggest obstacle.
There are lazy people, slackers, and folks who don’t step up, but generally, human beings are hardwired to hang in, not to leave or quit. 

What’s hard for human beings is letting go...

The most common biases
  • You’re focused on the time and energy you’ve already invested, or the sunk cost fallacy.
  • Your eyes are trained on positive cues -being overly optimistic and loss averse. Always trying harder and for longer.
  • When we realize we’re likely to fail at a job or other endeavor, we begin to see that goal as even more valuable than it was initially.
  • FOMO—and the fear of making a mistake.
Do this if you want to quit
  • Get a bead on your emotions. Don’t set yourself up for a “straw-that-broke-the-camel’s back” moment.
  • Motivate yourself. Quitting isn’t an end in and of itself; it’s a pathway to a new destination.

  • Make a plan that not only sets your new goal but anticipates possible setbacks and pitfalls along the way.

  • Prepare for the stress of transition. The best defence is knowing ahead of time how you’re likely to react.