Avoid Sounding Authoritative - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

6 Ways to Correct a Co-worker Without Coming Off as a Condescending Know-it-All

Avoid Sounding Authoritative

Being overly authoritative, confrontational, and closed-minded when making a correction will only make you look pretentious and condescending. 

Be open for discussion and try saying “I’m looking at page 10 of this document, and something’s not quite matching up for me. Can we take a quick look at this part together?”

180 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

6 Ways to Correct a Co-worker Without Coming Off as a Condescending Know-it-All

6 Ways to Correct a Co-worker Without Coming Off as a Condescending Know-it-All

https://www.themuse.com/advice/6-ways-to-correct-a-coworker-without-coming-off-as-a-condescending-knowitall

themuse.com

6

Key Ideas

Start With Something Positive

When telling someone he's wrong, don't be too direct with your approach:

Before jumping right in with something like, “This is really wrong!”, try saying, “It’s evident that you put a ton of time and effort into this project, and it looks great!

Incorporate Questions

Phrasing things as inquiries, rather than statements, makes it obvious that your intention is to facilitate a conversation that ultimately improves the end result—not just dole out strict demands.

Provide Evidence

Evidence is helpful for demonstrating that you have logical reasoning behind your correction—and that you’re not just shouting out random remarks to make your co-worker look incompetent.

Offer Help

It’s your chance to demonstrate that you weren’t trying to be insulting. Plus, you’ll be able to ensure that everything is correct the second time around.

Use a Gentle, Helpful Tone

When correcting someone, avoid yelling or screaming, don't use short sentences and avoid using defensive body language.

Try to maintain an overall positive posture.

EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The Right Time And Place

Pull the person you want to correct aside for a private, one-on-one conversation instead of highlighting their error in front of a larger group.
Also, to correct them before they get in trouble ...

Use Clarifying Questions

They will help you to:

  • Gut-check our own correction. Hearing another person's reasoning might get you to realize that you are actually the one who's wrong.
  • It makes you seem more aggressive and the person that did wrong might accept your help to make the necessary corrections.
Back Up Your Point With Evidence

When you’re correcting someone , be prepared to back up your point with real evidence, and not just your well-intended opinion.
Real data that supports your point is the single best way to correct false information.

one more idea

Let it Go

Interruptions can be frustrating. But, the point here is that not all of them are worthy of addressing.

Sometimes, the best thing you can do when faced with an interruption is nothing at all,...

Set Expectations From The Beginning

Whether you’re speaking up in a team meeting or you’re conducting a presentation, it’s important to be clear that you'll need to get all of your ideas out there before opening the floor to questions and contributions. 

This sets the tone right from the get-go that you’re aiming to share your ideas free of interruptions. This also makes it easy to halt an interrupter in his tracks.

Keep Going

Sometimes you can only fight fire with fire.

Refuse to pause for interruptions, and instead continue moving forward with your ideas. If needed, you can even pause for a second to address the interrupter and say, “one moment,” and then finish off your thought.

2 more ideas

Visibility As A Valuable Remote Work Skill
Visibility As A Valuable Remote Work Skill

Visibility at work is when you are included, recognized, and valued by networks within your organization. Its how you get credit for your work, get considered for advancement and build infl...

The Benefits Of More Face Time

Research found those who get more face time with management by being co-located are assigned better work assignments from their managers, are awarded promotions more frequently, and are less aware of their remote counterparts.

Many companies have learned how to integrate remote work into their business. Now is the time to set up structures to support the visibility and growth of remote teams long-term.

Creating A Digital Office That Feels Connected

There are four steps to it:

  • Communicate frequently.
  • Cultivate a shared identity and purpose.
  • Be dependable, reliable, and accessible.
  • Connect with others authentically.

To key to building a culture of visibility with your remote team is perceived proximity, where your remote team members feel connected to others mentally and emotionally. In the physical work environment, you feel comfortable talking to people, regardless of rank. However, you may feel more awkward to ping the CEO a question in chat when you've never seen them in the lunch line or said hi in the hallway.

4 more ideas