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Three reasons your presentations suck

You don’t care enough about the audience

Most people think they are the most important player in a presentation. They are wrong. The audience, the listeners, the people watching the presenter are the most important players.

Care about the audience, creating messages and stories that resonate with them and inspire them.

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Three reasons your presentations suck

Three reasons your presentations suck

https://www.fastcompany.com/90365976/three-reasons-your-presentations-suck

fastcompany.com

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Key Ideas

You don’t care enough about the audience

Most people think they are the most important player in a presentation. They are wrong. The audience, the listeners, the people watching the presenter are the most important players.

Care about the audience, creating messages and stories that resonate with them and inspire them.

The Words and the Design

The work on the presentation slides should be clear, crisp, concise, with fewer words and more visually striking simple imagery.

Long sentences and tiny words going through the whole slide are not advisable.

Lack of Practice

Invest your time practicing thoughtfully and getting in a zone where you are a natural.

An effortless-looking presentation makes the audience love it, even though you have toiled hard to make it look effortless.

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A TED Talk is 18 minutes long

TED curator Chris Anderson explains:

The 18-minute length works ...
Give a TED-style talk that gets a lot of views
  • Arrange and re-arranged your message onto the 9-up format - same size as sticky notes, until you are happy with the flow.
  • Solicit feedback from effective presenters that you trust to give honest, unfiltered feedback on your narrative and slides.
  • Rehearse with a great (honest) communicator -  a coach that is not afraid to speak up.
  • Make sure you articulate each point clearly.  Your audience should understand what’s magnificent about your big idea.
  • Practice with a clock counting up the minutes, to know how much you're over. Only then trim it down.
  • Once you're within the timeframe, practice with a clock counting down. Know roughly where you should be at 6, 12 and 18 minutes.
  • Be noteworthy. Let your coach jot down what you say well and what you don’t. 
  • Don’t be camera shy. Talk to the camera like there are humans on the other side of it. Practice by videotaping yourself.
  • Do one more FULL timed rehearsal right before you walk on stage.
  • Pick two natural places you could stop in your talk, then demarcate those as possible endings. You can then stop at your first ending point if you run over your time.
Steve Jobs' presentation style
  • A "Tweet-friendly headline" that summarises the product you're presenting: e.g.: "iPod: One thousand songs in your pocket."
  • Showing your passion: He acte...
Tweet-friendly headlines

Steve Jobs's intro sentences were so great because they clearly outlined what the product did while creating intrigue.

Rather than rambling on, he used them to perfectly convey his message as compactly as possible.

Examples of one sentence summaries of the product he was presenting: "Mac Book Air: the world's thinnest notebook", and "iPod: One thousand songs in your pocket."

Tailor to the audience

Whether you're networking or presenting, it's important to realize that it should never be a one-sided conversation.

Your audience is in the room for a particular reason. It's critical to understand why they're listening to you so you can tune your presentation in a manner that makes them more receptive listeners,

Ditch the Slides

Or at least don't make them the star of the show. 

You are the star. Your slides are your aides--your backup singers. Use them intermittently. 

Pack For The Climate Of Your Destination

Keep the nature of the occasion in mind as you prepare your message. Every situation and audience is different. 

Don't be tone-deaf. Your antennae must be sensitive to the need for formality or informality, seriousness or humor, words that work and words that won't.

Begin, Be Brief, Be Seated

There's no correlation between the length of a talk and its impact. 

Have a good beginning, a strong ending, and put the two as close together as possible.

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