Maintaining your network - Deepstash

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How to quit your job without hurting your career

Maintaining your network

Trade contact information with coworkers and supervisors to have a method to stay in touch. You will be in a better place to stay abreast of their career changes. You never know when you will meet with them again.

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You Dread Going to Work

While it’s normal to have qualms about the work day, if you truly, deeply dread those eight hours at the office, it is time to move on.

You’re Procrastinating
And  you do it more than your actual job. If there’s nothing you find engaging about your day-to-day work, you should consider if your current position is really a good fit for you.
It’s Taking a Toll on Your Health
  • Are your sick days adding up, out of the blue? 
  • Are you taking as much time off as you can possibly get?
  • Are you resorting to a few (or many) glasses of wine each night to get over a bad day at work? 
  • Are you working so many hours you have no time to exercise, eat healthily or get enough sleep? 
Dreading your job
Dreading your job

A lack of fulfillment at the workplace might be due to a misalignment between your purpose and your job.

Before deciding to quit your job, first exhaust all other avenues.

When to quit your job

If your boss or work environment is abusive, leave immediately.

However, if your boss or work environment aren't abusive and you've been there for only a few months, consider waiting. It takes around six months for anyone to settle into a job

Before quitting, figure out what’s wrong

If you've been at your job for more than six months, try to figure out the cause of your dread.

  • First, check your attitude. If your attitude is that work is just work, and you'll find your fulfillment elsewhere, you won't be committed. Other's will notice if you just check in and check out and label you as such.
  • Consider what else is wrong. Is it your coworker, your boss, or the job itself?
Feedback
Feedback

Feedback provides an opportunity to gain insights about a person's personal and professional actions.
Without feedback, we will move in the same direction without realizing our shortcomings. ...

Types of feedback
  • Positive vs. negative. Positive feedback confirms that someone is taking good action, while negative feedback shows what actions need to be corrected.
  • Formal vs. informal. Formal feedback is given on a set schedule, and informal feedback is short and follows after an action or event.
  • Annual vs. monthly
  • Verbal vs. written
  • Manager vs. peer
Effective feedback
Effective feedback is:
  • Objective. Don't let your personal feelings get in the way.
  • Timely. Feedback should follow when the event is still fresh.
  • Constructive. Give respect and show that you have their best interests in mind.
  • Actionable. Feedback must include immediate next steps.
  • Warranted. Give your employees room for mistakes and learn from them.