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How to have a true hobby, not a side hustle

The glow of the screen

If you find yourself losing many hours to your devices, don't pick a hobby that is screen-based. Screen time has been linked to depression and anxiety. Phones can also prevent our ability to focus.

Try and engage in active, or outdoor hobbies like bird watching, hiking, or dancing.

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How to have a true hobby, not a side hustle

How to have a true hobby, not a side hustle

https://www.vox.com/the-highlight/2019/11/25/20975946/hobby-what-should-i-try-how-to

vox.com

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Key Ideas

Hobbies for relaxation

Americans have roughly 5 hours of leisure per day. However, watching TV takes up more than half of those hours. Then, when we do make use of those leisure hours, our hustle culture makes us turn our leisure activities into a race to see who can do it the best.

It is perfectly fine to do a hobby just because we want to relax.

The“fantasy self”

One mistake people make when starting a hobby is picking something aspirational rather than something they enjoy. When you pick a hobby, stay true to what you enjoy. If you like cooking, try to take your current skills up a notch. If you like writing, try a fiction workshop.

If you want to try something totally new, start small. To hold yourself accountable, enlist friends in the effort.

Hobbies and side hustles

A hobby is not a side hustle. It is important to develop hobbies outside of our economy with no financial motives attached.

Since a leisure pursuit is an outlet for stress, the pure pleasure of engaging in a hobby should be enough. A hobby not only helps to refuel us for a busy work life but also helps us to practice deep focus.

The glow of the screen

If you find yourself losing many hours to your devices, don't pick a hobby that is screen-based. Screen time has been linked to depression and anxiety. Phones can also prevent our ability to focus.

Try and engage in active, or outdoor hobbies like bird watching, hiking, or dancing.

Changing routines

Change your location or routine. A change in your environment can be good to reinvent your routine. You may be inspired to try new hobbies as a byproduct of the change.

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One approach for recharging leads to balance and recovery. It suggests you use your downtime for something unrelated to your job that will refresh you. Think about it in terms of detachment, relaxation, autonomy, mastery, meaning, and affiliation.

You first have to understand which of your needs are least satisfied by your work, then choose hobbies which fulfill these needs. If your work does not offer enough social interaction, pick a social pastime. If your job is not challenging, choose a hobby where you can learn new skills.

Enrichment Theory

Enrichment Theory offers a perspective from work psychology and points out that the skills and experiences we build in our free time can complement our work performance.

It suggests that you find a hobby that touches on your job in some way. If you want to use your leadership skills, play the role of team captain for your local soccer team.

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  • Casual leisure: short-lived, immediately gratifying, and often passive; it includes activities like drinking, online shopping, and the aforementioned binge-watching.
  • Serious leisure: meaningful, challenging activities that cause you to grow as a person.
The instinct for leisure
We need to be as vigilant about the quality of our free time as we are about the quality of our work.

In a live-to-work society, where your career is also your identity and status, the instinct for leisure atrophies. Paradoxically, then, getting a good weekend means working at leisure.

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  • Loss of interest or happiness in activities such as sex or hobbies.
  • Sleep disturbances, including insomnia and sleeping too much.
  • Tiredness and lack of energy for even the smallest activities.
  • Increased cravings for food.
  • Anxiety, agitation, and restlessness.
  • Trouble thinking, concentrating, making decisions, and remembering things
  • Unexplained physical problems, such as back pain or headaches
  • Avoiding people.
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Refocus Your Attention

After you have redefined success, consider how you want to invest your time and energy. 

There will always be more work to be done, but make a choice to spend your time elsewhere: with family, friends, or in your community. And when you spend time with your family or friends, do so with undivided attention.

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Focus on 3 things every day
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Analyze and Identify

Get perspective and clarity on which area of your life you have to focus on. Start by analyzing, examining and identifying the problem areas:

  • Fun and Recreation
  • Physical Environment
  • Career
  • Finances
  • Personal Growth
  • Romance
  • Family and Friends
  • Health

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