Preparation - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Get an account to save ideas & make your own & organize them how you wish.

deepstash

Beta

Why behavior change is hard - and why you should keep trying - Harvard Health

Preparation

At this stage, you know you must change, you believe you can, and are making plans to do so soon. You've also taken some initial steps.

  • It is important to anticipate obstacles and plan ways around them.
  • Create an action plan with realistic goals. Once you are able to meet them, you can work your way up to more ambitious goals.

791 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Why behavior change is hard - and why you should keep trying - Harvard Health

Why behavior change is hard - and why you should keep trying - Harvard Health

https://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/why-behavior-change-is-hard-and-why-you-should-keep-trying

health.harvard.edu

8

Key Ideas

Successful behavior change

One potential problem when changing behaviors is that we're too often motivated by negatives such as guilt, fear, or regret.

  • Research found that long-lasting change in behavior is most likely when it's self-motivated and rooted in positive thinking.
  • Studies have also shown that goals are easier to reach if they're specific.
  • You should also limit the number of goals you're trying to reach to prevent overtaxing your attention and willpower.

Change is a process

... not an event. The transtheoretical model (TTM) presupposes that at any given time, a person is in one of five stages of change: precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, maintenance.

Each stage is a preparation for the next one, so you mustn't hurry through or skip stages.

Precontemplation

At this stage, you have no conscious intention of making a change. People in this stage tend to avoid reading, talking, or thinking about unhealthy behavior. However, their awareness and interest may be sparked by outside influences.

Contemplation

At this stage, you're aware that the behavior is a problem, but you still haven't committed to taking action.

To move on to the next stage, make a list of the pros and cons, then examine the disadvantages and consider how to overcome them: If one 30-minute exercise is too much, how about two 15-minute sessions?

Preparation

At this stage, you know you must change, you believe you can, and are making plans to do so soon. You've also taken some initial steps.

  • It is important to anticipate obstacles and plan ways around them.
  • Create an action plan with realistic goals. Once you are able to meet them, you can work your way up to more ambitious goals.

Action

At this stage, you've changed. You are able to face the challenges of life without the old behavior. For example, if stress tempts you to eat, you can use healthy coping strategies such as exercise.

Be clear about your motivation; write down your reasons for making the change and remind yourself daily. Get support.

Maintenance

Once you've practiced the new behavior for six months, you're in the maintenance stage.

Shift your focus to integrate the change into your life and prevent relapse. It may require other changes, like avoiding situations or triggers associated with the old habit.

Relapse and recycling are common

The path between stages is seldom straightforward. Most people relapse at some point and recycle through one or more stages, though you usually won't go back to square one.

Every time you relapse, you will learn something about yourself. Next time, you can use what you learned, make changes, and be wiser as you continue on the path.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Pre-Contemplation

In this stage of change, individuals are aware of the behavioral change they desire; however, they have no conscious intention of altering their behavior. They may be strongly influence...

Contemplation

In this stage of change, an individual acknowledges the problem and begins an internal debate about pursuing change. A lot of time may be spent in this stage as many may not be ready to commit to changing.

People often get stuck in this stage going back and forth between measuring the benefits and costs of behavioral change. A thorough cost-benefit analysis followed by a troubleshooting session can be helpful here, especially if it is done in written form.

Preparation

In this stage of change, individuals commit to the intention of changing in the immediate future and have accepted the costs and benefits. What determines the success of an individual in this stage is their commitment to exploring, planning and insuring.

Set up contracts with yourself, by setting specific measurable goals, and detailing how you will accomplish the task at hand, including contingencies in order to stay on track. 

2 more ideas

The Stages of Change
  1. Precontemplation: Not ready. Not now.
  2. Contemplation: Maybe soon — thinking about it.
  3. Preparation: Ready, taking small steps.
  4. Action: ...
New Year Resolutions that Stick

Whether it is a resolution to lose weight, to do more exercise, or to consume less sugar, we all have encountered hardships trying to stick with them.

Health-related New Year Resolutions are ...

One Thing At A Time

Making resolutions requires no effort, but if we decide to suddenly shift towards improving too many of our behaviors at once, it can backfire.

Focus on one thing that you want to change, at a time, and commit to it.

What You Can Control

You may not be able to change the external circumstances, stressful situations, or work environment. What you can do is control how you react to negative forces and stressful situations.

For example: If you get unhealthy food at your home, you can control how or when you eat it.

8 more ideas

Self-Control

 ... is the ability to regulate and alter responses in order to avoid undesirable behaviors, increase desirable ones, and achieve long-term goals.

Research on Self-Control
  • A 2011 survey found that 27 % of respondents identified a lack of willpower as the primary factor keeping them from reaching their goals. 
  • One study found that students who exhibited greater self-discipline had better grades, higher test scores, and were more likely to be admitted to a competitive academic program. 
  • The study also found that when it came to academic success, self-control was a more important factor than IQ scores.
  • A health study found that people who were rated as having high levels of self-control during childhood continued to have high levels of physical and mental health in adulthood.
  • Research has found that self-control is a limited resource. In the long-term, exercising self-control tends to strengthen it. 
Motivation and Monitoring

A lack of willpower is not the only factor that affects goal attainment.

  • There needs to be a clear goal and the motivation to change. Having an unclear or overly general goal and insufficient motivation can lead to failure.
  • You need to monitor your actions daily towards the achievement of the goal.
  • You need to have willpower.

one more idea

Change is inevitable

If a change is well planned, it can produce positive results. However, without planning, change can be hard to accept and appreciate.

The Kubler-Ross Model is the most reliable tool to un...

The Kubler-Ross Model

The Kubler-Ross Model, also known as the five stages of grief, consists of the various levels of emotions that are experienced when facing trauma. The five stages are denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance.

After the model was widely accepted, it was found to be valid in a majority of cases and situations related to change.

Relevance in Business

The Kubler-Ross Change Curve is also true when it comes to business, work, or employment.  

Change can cause a lot of upheaval to the employees. If there are improvements to be made in systems and policies, the employees can't persist in their old ways. Only when the employees of an organization make personal change, can the company move ahead to reap the benefits.

4 more ideas

New Year Resolutions
New Year Resolutions

93% of us set new year resolutions, with the common themes being about losing weight, eating better, starting an exercise regime, or saving money.

Research shows that 45% of people ...

Authentic Motivation

Why we set our goals matters. If it is out of fear or social expectations, then they are not going to last.

Authentic values are what helps achieve our goals, as there is a never-ending supply of willpower when we are doing what aligns with our innermost core.

Use Positive Framing

Resolving that you won't have any alcohol keeps the focus on the alcohol. Instead of focusing on what you don't want to do, focus on the positive aspect, like drinking more water.

Use gratitude and other positive emotions to steer your mind out of any pitfalls.

5 more ideas

Phases of motivation

People cycle through periods of motivation, especially in the New Year. It’s best to harness these bursts of 'can-do energy' whenever they appear.

The action phase

The New Year's resolution or 'action phase' is when you're highly motivated for change. Use it to set things in motion and automate as much as you can. 

  • Put your bills on autopay
  • Start using a savings app
  • Cut out any subscriptions you don't really need.
The maintenance phase

If you don't have a plan when the New Year's glow has worn off in a few months, you will stop doing whatever you promised to do. 

To force yourself to stick to a budget:

  • Write down everything you spend.
  • Add it up at the end of every week.
  • Submit a report to help keep you accountable.

one more idea

Weight-loss interventions

We make more than 200 food decisions a day, and most of these appear to be habitual, which means we eat without thinking about what or how much food we consume.

A new study found weight-l...

Ten healthy habits
  1. Keep a meal routine: Eat at roughly the same time each day.
  2. Go for healthy fats from nuts, avocado, and oily fish instead of fast food.
  3. Walk off the weight: Aim for 10,000 steps a day.
  4. Pack healthy snacks when you go out.
  5. Always check the labels for fat, sugar, and salt content.
  6. Use smaller plates, and drink a glass of water and wait five minutes before going back for seconds.
  7. Break up sitting time.
  8. Choose water and limit fruit juice to one small glass per day.
  9. Slow down and eat while sitting at a table.
  10. Always aim for five servings of vegetables a day.
Making Motivation Dependent Plans

A motivational spike tends to go down as excitement wears off. The brain is designed to keep us away from a problem; not to easily put the effort that could change us for good.

Replacing Old Habits

If you don’t plan on what to do, you will find yourself in the same position you were yesterday.

Replace your bad habits with a good habit. Don’t just run away from them.

Using a Reward System

Having a system of rewards and punishments will make the process of changing less daunting as you have multiple points of rewarded success leading to a larger one.

To change yourself faster, learn to associate what you want to do with a reward. 

5 more ideas

Internal vs. external motivation
Internal motivation, the drive to achieve that comes from inside a person is the kind of motivation that can lead to life-changing improvements and well-being.

External ...

Self-Efficacy

It means believing in your ability to perform a task and achieve goals. There are 3 ways to build self-efficacy:

  • Ensure early success. When first starting out, choose activities you're certain you can do successfully.
  • Watch others succeed in the activity you want to try.  This is particularly effective if the person you're observing is similar to you (friends, neighbors, co-workers).
  • Find a supportive voice. Personal trainers and coaches are skilled in giving appropriate encouragement, as are good friends (usually).
Fundamentally Independent Thinking (FIT)

A fundamentally independent thinker understands that nothing makes a person upset, angry, or depressed; rather, what a person thinks about the world determines how they feel

3 more ideas