deepstash

Beta

People Don't Follow Titles: Necessity and Sufficiency in Leadership

Legitimacy

One of the sufficient conditions of leadership is legitimacy. But titles do not confer legitimacy.

If your team, organization, or country doesn't view you as legitimate, you will have a tough time getting anything done.

53 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

People Don't Follow Titles: Necessity and Sufficiency in Leadership

People Don't Follow Titles: Necessity and Sufficiency in Leadership

https://fs.blog/2017/06/necessity-sufficiency-leadership/

fs.blog

4

Key Ideas

Conditions for leadership

There is a difference between the necessary conditions for leadership and sufficient ones.

For instance, in war, it is necessary to know the capabilities of your enemy and their positions, but it is not sufficient to win a battle.
Being in a position of leadership is necessary to lead an organization, but it is not sufficient to get people moving towards a common goal. 

Titles and trust

Title based leaders feel everyone will fall in line because of their title. They think they are leading because they are in charge. 

But a necessary condition for leadership is trust, not a title. You have to earn trust.

Legitimacy

One of the sufficient conditions of leadership is legitimacy. But titles do not confer legitimacy.

If your team, organization, or country doesn't view you as legitimate, you will have a tough time getting anything done.

Sufficient conditions

To be accepted as a leader, you have to prove yourself. 

People will only follow you if they believe in you, and see that you are working for them. They need to know that your leadership will create something that will continue.

EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Peter Drucker

"Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things."

Peter Drucker
Change Leadership Styles

Sometimes a teammate needs a warm hug. Sometimes the team needs a visionary, a new style of coaching, someone to lead the way or even, on occasion, a kick in the bike shorts. 

For that reason, great leaders choose their leadership style like a golfer chooses his or her club, with a calculated analysis of the matter at hand, the end goal and the best tool for the job.

Daniel Goleman’s leadership styles
  1. Pacesetting leader - “Do as I do, now”: expects and models excellence and self-direction. 
  2. Authoritative leader - “Come with me”: mobilizes the team toward a common vision.
  3. Affiliative leader - “People come first”:  works to create emotional bonds that bring a feeling of belonging.
  4. Coaching leader - "Try this": develops people for the future.
  5. Coercive leader - “Do what I tell you”: demands immediate compliance.
  6. Democratic leader - “What do you think?": builds consensus through participation.
Exercising Integrity

Not every leader is benevolent. Many leaders have insight, initiative, influence, and impact but their lives and legacies are tainted by a lack of integrity.

A great leader must have a lif...

Being Impactful

The measure of leadership is the impact they have on their followers. How much of a difference they make.

They’re either instrumental in creating real lasting change, or they’re not leaders. They’re just entertainers.

Exerting Influence

An authentic leader draws people and compels them to act with his vision and values. He also gives off a positive vibe and is good at persuading others to his point of view.

2 more ideas

Charismatic Leadership Style

Max Weber defined charisma as “[a] certain quality of an individual personality, by virtue of which he is set apart from ordinary men and treated as endowed with supernatural, superhuman, or at ...

History of charismatic leadership
  • In medieval times, leadership was mostly based on tradition. Most people never met their leaders and leadership was legitimized by the divine right of kings - charisma was not needed.
  • The 19th and the 20th century were full of charismatic leaders. Technological (newspaper, radio, and TV) allowed leaders to transport their charisma over long distances.
  • Our current globalized world and access to social media have led to another rise in charismatic leaders. On Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter, many people support leaders solely based on their charisma.
Dangers of charismatic leadership

Most of the dangers of the charismatic movement relate to this power.

  • Charismatic leaders lose support more quickly than other types of leaders.
  • They have to clearly be the best person for the job at hand – always and in any situation. This is why they often engage in a cult of personality and become resistant to criticism.
  • Things that charismatic leaders do to maintain their power are precisely the things that diminish it when their business, country, or other undertaking encounters problems.
  • When charismatic leaders use their position to motivate their followers to do things they would not normally do, the followers often feel betrayed once they suspect that they might not get the expected payoff. 
  • They often eventually take the praise of their followers too seriously and show narcissistic traits. They consider criticism as disobedience and expect total loyalty. 

2 more ideas