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Sleep deprivation may be making you unpopular and lonely

Loneliness

Studies show that lack of sleep can lead to unfriendly and reclusive behavior, and has the same impact on the people around you. As a result, unslept people are lonelier.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Sleep deprivation may be making you unpopular and lonely

Sleep deprivation may be making you unpopular and lonely

https://www.businessinsider.com/sleep-deprivation-could-be-making-you-unpopular-and-lonely-2018-11

businessinsider.com

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Key Ideas

Loneliness

Studies show that lack of sleep can lead to unfriendly and reclusive behavior, and has the same impact on the people around you. As a result, unslept people are lonelier.

Other Consequences of Lack Of Sleep

  • Lack of sleep can result in a feeling that our space is being invaded, leading to us distancing ourselves from others, physically.
  • The region of the brain which is responsible for compassion and sociability is less active in those with sleep deprivation.
  • Other people perceive those with sleep deprivation as socially 'repulsive' and surprisingly start to show the same symptoms if they deal with them for a while.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The Science of Sleep

The average adult spends 36 % (or about one-third) of his or her life asleep.

Purpose of Sleep:

  • Restoration
  • Memory Consolidation
  • Metabolic Health
Restoration

The first purpose of sleep is restoration.

Every day, your brain accumulates metabolic waste as it goes about its normal neural activities. Sleeping restores the brains healthy condition by removing these waste products. Accumulation of these waste products has been linked to many brain-related disorders.

Memory Consolidation

The second purpose of sleep is memory consolidation.

Sleep is crucial for memory consolidation, which is responsible for your long term memories. Insufficient or fragmented sleep can hamper your ability to remember facts and feelings/emotions.

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Sleep more

Sleeping can help us fight anxiety.

We are less worried or anxious after a good night's sleep, as compared to no sleep or even disturbed sleep.

NREM and REM Sleep

REM, the Rapid Eye Movement stage of sleep happens when our eyes are moving fast; we are said to be dreaming in that stage.

NREM (Non-Rapid Eye Movement) is the stage of sleep when we are in deep sleep and are not moving. In this stage, our brain is able to clear toxins and consolidate memories.

The deepest part of sleep
Slow-Wave stage of NREM (Non-Rapid Eye Movement) sleep is the deepest phase of sleep.
This stage, which repairs and restores the brain, readies you for the next day, fully awake and functioning at an optimal level.
Consequences Of Too Little Sleep
Consequences Of Too Little Sleep

It is common knowledge that we need to sleep to be our best. And constant sleep loss has serious effects, including death.

Sleep is a neurological activity, and still, sleep-deprived cr...

No Sleep = No Restoration

Sleep, according to deep research on flies, has a function of reversing the ancient biochemical process of oxidation. Without sleep, there is no restoration possible.

Sleep studies prove it is worse than starvation, as early studies (19th century) conducted on puppies showed that they died in about five days if deprived of sleep and kept in motion.

Reactive Oxygen Species

... or ROS is a molecule that builds up in the intestines of animals that are denied sleep.

  • Studies conducted on fruit flies and mice showed rising levels of ROS when kept in sleep deprivation.

  • Antioxidants, when given to sleep-deprived flies, made them healthy and active again, proving that the artificial restoration is possible.

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Slow-wave sleep (deep sleep) – SWS

About 80% of our sleeping is of the SWS variety, identified by slow brain waves, relaxed muscles and deep breathing.

Deep sleep is important for the consolidation of memories. New experience...

Rapid eye movement (dreaming) - REM

Dreaming accounts for 20% of our sleeping time.

The length of dreams can vary from a few seconds to almost an hour. During REM sleep, the brain is highly active. The muscles are paralyzed, and the heart rate increases. Breathing can become erratic. 

Sleep quantity

Although eight hours is the common mention, optimum sleep can vary from person to person and from age to age.

One review that worked through 320 research articles concluded 7 - 9 hours of sleep are enough for adults. According to experts, too little or too much sleep can both have a negative impact on your health.

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The necessary amount of sleep
The necessary amount of sleep

Most adults function best after 7-9 hours of sleep a night.

When we get less than 7 hours, we’re impaired (to degrees that vary from person to person).  When sleep persistently fa...

Polyphasic sleeping

It's based on the idea that by partitioning your sleep into segments, you can get away with less of it.

Though it is possible to train oneself to sleep in spurts instead of a single nightly block, it does not seem possible to train oneself to need less sleep per 24-hour cycle.

Replacing sleep with caffeine

Caffeine works primarily by blocking the action of a chemical called adenosine, which slows down our neural activity, allowing us to relax, rest, and sleep.

By interfering with it, caffeine cuts the brake lines of the brain’s alertness system. Eventually, if we don’t allow our body to relax, the buzz turns to anxiety.

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5 hours of sleep is enough

Habitual sleep deprivation is associated with diverse and far-reaching health effects and none of them is good.

Between 7 and 9 hours of sleep per night are recommended. You can get used to l...

Watching Television before bed

Cellphones, tablets, and all kinds of personal electronics are not a good idea when you’re getting ready for bed.

Researchers have increasingly focused on “blue light” emitted by screens and its effect on sleep and negative sleep-related health outcomes.

It doesn’t matter when you sleep

Our bodies tend to follow a natural rhythm of wakefulness and sleep that is attuned to sunrise and sunset for a reason.

While some missed sleep here and there isn’t necessarily a big deal, shifting your sleep schedule long term isn’t healthy.

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Disrupted daily routines
Disrupted daily routines

The current pandemic is disrupting daily routines around the world.

  • Overwhelmed hospitals, desolate schools, ghostly towns, and self-isolation look like scenes from a horror movie and...
Sleep in uncertain times

It is exactly during times of social uncertainty and anxiety, when we need sleep the most, that it is most disrupted.
We need sleep for maintaining the immunological function, which is key to preventing and recovering from infectious diseases (like the one created by the new virus).

Sleep problems
  • Anxiety over the future and fear for the health of loved ones increase hyper-arousal and rumination, thus intensifying insomnia.
  • Isolation from regular social rhythms and natural light will mess with our body clock, confusing us about when we are supposed to feel tired and when to perk up.
  • The smartphone age has already led to a substantial deterioration in both duration and quality of sleep.

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Getting Sufficient Sleep

When you’re consistently not getting enough sleep, you get used to feeling tired, and your body adapts to function on that amount of sleep. But this doesn’t mean that you’re performing at you...

8 Hours Of Sleep

Although it is recommended that healthy adults should aim for seven to nine hours of sleep, everyone is different. There are people who need just three to four hours to stay alert. 

If you’re not sure how many hours of sleep you need on a daily basis, experimentation is the best way to go. Try waking up without an alarm and figure out what your natural wake-up time is. Observe how adding or subtracting one hour of sleep impacts your productivity.

“Catch Up” Sleep On Weekends

The harm of bingeing on sleep on Saturday and Sunday is that it makes it hard to get a full and well-constructed night of sleep on Sunday night, which then sends us off into the workweek on the wrong foot.

If you don’t try to wake up at a similar time at the weekend, it is similar to giving yourself jet lag every weekend.

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Sleep And Weight Fluctuation
Sleep And Weight Fluctuation

Sleeping less has been associated with increased risk of obesity, and addition of body fat, as it affects the overall metabolism of the body, and can also affect our appetite.

Sleep duratio...

More Sleep Means Better Metabolism
  • Various studies point out that sleep influences two appetite hormones, leptin (to decrease appetite) and ghrelin (to stimulate appetite), which is also known as the hunger hormone.
  • Lack of sleep is associated with higher levels of ghrelin and lower levels of leptin, making the person more likely to overeat.
More Sleep And More Exercise
  • Sleep-deprived people crave for and also end up eating more carb-rich foods and sugar.
  • Sleep duration affects the release of insulin in the body, that affects our glucose levels, and prolonged sleep deprivation can lead to obesity and type 2 diabetes.
  • Research shows that exercise prevents the damage done by lack of sleep and also makes one eat less.

To stay healthy, one has to sleep more and also do regular exercise.

Bad habits that affect sleep quality
  • Exercising close to bedtime: it can act as a stimulate and keep you from falling asleep;
  • Scanning your phone in bed: bright light tricks your body into thinking it's dayt...