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Self-Control Is Just Empathy With Your Future Self

The Theory Of Mind

The Theory Of Mind
The Right Temporoparietal Junction part of our brain helps us think about other people, understanding their mental states. 
If this region is well developed and better connected to other parts of the brain, people behave altruistically and show less bias in their groups. If this region is impaired, people lose their sense of morality.

New studies about this region of the brain tell us that impulsivity and selfishness are linked, and are the opposite of restraint and empathy.

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Self-Control Is Just Empathy With Your Future Self

Self-Control Is Just Empathy With Your Future Self

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2016/12/self-control-is-just-empathy-with-a-future-you/509726/

theatlantic.com

2

Key Ideas

Self-Control

Self-control, an ability to overcome your current state of want or desire, and appreciate the needs of your future self, is similar to the feelings of empathy and selflessness, which essentially is the same ability projected on others.

The feelings of self-control and empathy generate from the area of our brain known as the right temporoparietal junction.

The Theory Of Mind

The Right Temporoparietal Junction part of our brain helps us think about other people, understanding their mental states. 
If this region is well developed and better connected to other parts of the brain, people behave altruistically and show less bias in their groups. If this region is impaired, people lose their sense of morality.

New studies about this region of the brain tell us that impulsivity and selfishness are linked, and are the opposite of restraint and empathy.

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John Green, Looking for Alaska

“Imagining the future is a kind of nostalgia.”

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We use our memories to imagine the future

We predict what the future will look like by using our memories. This is how actions we do repeatedly become routine. For example, you have an ideas of what your day will look like at work tomorrow based on what your day was like today, and all the other days you’ve spent working.

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Past and future for amnesia patients

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