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What is "self-inflicted stress"?

Self-inflicted stress

Self-inflicted stress
It's the type of stress we force on ourselves through the way we manage our expectations, time, relationships and emotions. A few examples:
  • Putting pressure on yourself to excel at something within an unrealistic timespan.
  • Negative self-talk after not being able to complete something.
  • Not having enough time in the day to complete your "to-do" list.
  • An "all or nothing" attitude.

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What is "self-inflicted stress"?

What is "self-inflicted stress"?

https://bigthink.com/personal-growth/self-inflicted-stress-management

bigthink.com

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Key Ideas

Self-inflicted stress

It's the type of stress we force on ourselves through the way we manage our expectations, time, relationships and emotions. A few examples:
  • Putting pressure on yourself to excel at something within an unrealistic timespan.
  • Negative self-talk after not being able to complete something.
  • Not having enough time in the day to complete your "to-do" list.
  • An "all or nothing" attitude.

Managing self-inflicted stress

  • Use the 60-second method: Set aside 60 seconds of pause before doing anything in relation to what is stressing you out. Don't react.
  • Manage your time in a realistic way.
  • Ask for help and accept that you might not be able to accomplish everything on your own.
  • Acknowledge that your stress is mostly self-inflicted and make changes to fix that.

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Not all stress is bad for you
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  • Exercise daily.
  • Focus your energy on what you can control.
  • Know that your stress response is unique to you.
Anxiety

Anxiety is the culmination of worry and stress. It is a state of body and mind which is stressed and worried for no apparent reason, like a response to a false alarm.

An anxiety disorder is an acute form of anxiety and a serious medical condition.


How to Handle Anxiety:

  • Curb your sugar, alcohol and caffeine consumption.
  • Calm yourself by deep breathing and refocusing on your body parts.
  • Distract yourself by listening to music or a little exercise.
Stress, worry and anxiety can be helped by regular exercise, a nutritious diet and an ample amount of sleep.