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Four Things to Do Every Day for Your Mental Health

Connect

Community is a form of medicine. We need to feel seen, heard, and understood and extend the same in return.

It won't just happen. You're going to need to schedule it. Listen and offer your support with generosity. Invite others to do the same.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Four Things to Do Every Day for Your Mental Health

Four Things to Do Every Day for Your Mental Health

https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/four_things_to_do_every_day_for_your_mental_health

greatergood.berkeley.edu

5

Key Ideas

Structure in times of chaos

Human suffering is often about freedom and constraint. We rebel against too much containment (“I need space!”) or if we have too much freedom, we feel lost in space. Fearful. (“Where did you go?”)

The global pandemic disrupted our social structures. Some structures create a connection - at work, the gym or the coffee shop - and others create distance - saying goodbye to our partners and kids in the morning, It is normal to react when our old structures are broken, but we have the opportunity to create our own.

Move

Our bodies need to stretch, reach, twist, bend, step, and sweat. It's not about staying in shape. It's about your immune health and mental health.

Build movement in your structure. Try for at least 20 minutes per day.

Nourish

You don't have to ban small treats. However, it is essential to set up a daily structure that fills you with nourishing healthy foods.

Make a dietary change, learn to meal prep, or teach your kids to cook.

Connect

Community is a form of medicine. We need to feel seen, heard, and understood and extend the same in return.

It won't just happen. You're going to need to schedule it. Listen and offer your support with generosity. Invite others to do the same.

Be

We need to pause long enough to let our nervous system come back to baseline after prolonged activation.

Experiment with what works for you, be it guided relaxation or watching a TV show.

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Try to keep a routine

Doing so during stressful of traumatic periods of time will boost your resilience.
A routine could mean: eating meals at the same hours, sleeping, setting regular times to exercise, etc.

Exercise routines

This is an excellent way to stay healthy and occupy your time while being indoors.
Anything that gets your heart pumping or builds muscle is excellent for both physical and mental health.

Going outside

This is much easier in the country or suburbs. But remember to stay six feet away from other people.
Spending time in nature is a boon to both mental and physical health.

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Self-Care Is Not One-Size Fits All

You have to start giving up most of your vices in order to truly dedicate yourself to self-care and to larger causes. But there are healthy indulgences we can enjoy.

These are ...

Self-Care Is Difficult

It is much easier for us to make decisions that feel good right now (“quick-fixes”) than it is to have the discipline to make decisions that may suck now but feel really great later.

Self-care can be really hard because it’s a long-term play. But your well-being is worth the trouble. 

Self-Care Is Not Self-Indulgence

  • Self-indulgence is the “excessive or unrestrained gratification of one’s own appetites, desires, or whims. Self-indulgent behaviors alter our mood or provide us with a means of temporary escape.
  • Self-care yields you long-term benefits without causing harm. And in a way, it’s a selfless act as it will make you a more engaged and impassioned person. 

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Have ‘detox’ periods

Schedule regular multi-day breaks from social media. 

Pay attention to how you feel

Experiment with using your favorite online platforms at different times of day and for varying lengths of time, to see how you feel during and after each session.

You may find that a few short spurts help you feel better than spending 45 minutes exhaustively scrolling through a site’s feed. 

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