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How the new virus is changing the recruiting and hiring process

The new status quo

In the past, 44% of companies wouldn’t entertain remote working, and now pretty much every company has to do it.
Companies will have to see that their employees can be productive at home. Some companies will flourish and new ways of working and new technologies will emerge.

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How the new virus is changing the recruiting and hiring process

How the new virus is changing the recruiting and hiring process

https://www.fastcompany.com/90481508/how-covid-19-is-changing-the-recruiting-and-hiring-process

fastcompany.com

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Key Ideas

Looking locally first

Because of social distancing, many companies are pulling back on national or global advertising. They started limiting their geographic search and are now looking locally first.
This could be good news for internal candidates, many of whom are getting a closer look.

Adapting the interview process

Face-to-face interviews are not really possible and recommended anymore, and everybody’s been replacing them with their video equivalent.
How a company adapts its interview process can be a preview to its culture: by accommodating different comfort levels, companies aren’t just saying they have a good culture; they’re showing it.

New onboarding process

The onboarding process for newly hired candidates is becoming virtual, too. 

You need to offer plenty of resources and information, with scheduled conversations through video. You need to introduce a routine into their lives.

The new status quo

In the past, 44% of companies wouldn’t entertain remote working, and now pretty much every company has to do it.
Companies will have to see that their employees can be productive at home. Some companies will flourish and new ways of working and new technologies will emerge.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The Interviewer’s Perspective

When the interviewer asks you, “Tell me about yourself”, he is hoping this question will get you talking. It will give him a first impression of you, and set the tone for the inte...

How Not to Answer

  • Prepare a brief summary of the high points of each of your past positions, but do not turn it into a very long monologue that makes the interviewer glaze over with information overload.
  • You do not have to brag, but don't rely on the interviewer to see past your humble exterior and figure out how great you are. Find a way to present yourself to your full advantage.
  • This is not the time to talk about all your personal details. Focus on who you are as a professional.
  • Because this question can be interpreted in many ways, do not be overwhelmed by it. Delve right in with your prepared answers.

Your elevator pitch

You need a short summary of yourself as a job candidate. Keep it focused, ideally less than a minute, and no more than two minutes.
  • Address what your primary selling points are for this job. The number of years of experience or special skill.  Focus on the qualifications in the job description and how you meet and exceed it.
  • Explain why you are interested in this position. 

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Existing divisions

Epidemics and other natural disasters tend to both illuminate and reinforce existing divisions.

  • The division in our society is between those who can keep their jobs and work from...

Hope for low-income workers

History offers a precedent. Collective anger at low wages and poor working protections can produce lasting social change.

  • One study that looked at 15 significant pandemics revealed an increase in wages for three decades afterward.
  • After the Plague of Justinian, worker incomes doubled.
  • After the Black Death in the 1300s, textile workers in northern France received three raises a year.

Workers' rights

The pandemic may be bad for workers’ rights.

  • The pandemic might be blamed on outsiders - the Black Death led to massacres of Jews across Europe.
  • In the past decades, many low-income whites have become allied with other whites, not with poor people.
  • Organized labor is still far off. Busy employees at large retailers are spread across the country and don't have a centralized way to communicate.

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Questions for the Important Traits

Grit- ask on how determined a person in pursuing his dreams.

Rigor- ask if there was a time he considered a data to make a decision.

Impact- ask for what he have co...

When asking questions on the candidate's unique contribution..

Probe: give me an example…

Dig: who, what, where, when, why and how on every accomplishment or project

Differentiate: we vs. I, good vs. great, exposure vs. expertise, participant vs. owner/leader, 20 yard line vs. 80 yard line

Applying STAR questions

SituationWhat's the background of what you were working on?

TaskWhat tasks were you given?

ActionWhat actions did you take?

Results- What results did you measure?

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