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How the new virus is changing the recruiting and hiring process

The new status quo

In the past, 44% of companies wouldn’t entertain remote working, and now pretty much every company has to do it.
Companies will have to see that their employees can be productive at home. Some companies will flourish and new ways of working and new technologies will emerge.

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How the new virus is changing the recruiting and hiring process

How the new virus is changing the recruiting and hiring process

https://www.fastcompany.com/90481508/how-covid-19-is-changing-the-recruiting-and-hiring-process

fastcompany.com

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Key Ideas

Looking locally first

Because of social distancing, many companies are pulling back on national or global advertising. They started limiting their geographic search and are now looking locally first.
This could be good news for internal candidates, many of whom are getting a closer look.

Adapting the interview process

Face-to-face interviews are not really possible and recommended anymore, and everybody’s been replacing them with their video equivalent.
How a company adapts its interview process can be a preview to its culture: by accommodating different comfort levels, companies aren’t just saying they have a good culture; they’re showing it.

New onboarding process

The onboarding process for newly hired candidates is becoming virtual, too. 

You need to offer plenty of resources and information, with scheduled conversations through video. You need to introduce a routine into their lives.

The new status quo

In the past, 44% of companies wouldn’t entertain remote working, and now pretty much every company has to do it.
Companies will have to see that their employees can be productive at home. Some companies will flourish and new ways of working and new technologies will emerge.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The Interviewer’s Perspective

When the interviewer asks you, “Tell me about yourself”, he is hoping this question will get you talking. It will give him a first impression of you, and set the tone for the inte...

How Not to Answer
  • Prepare a brief summary of the high points of each of your past positions, but do not turn it into a very long monologue that makes the interviewer glaze over with information overload.
  • You do not have to brag, but don't rely on the interviewer to see past your humble exterior and figure out how great you are. Find a way to present yourself to your full advantage.
  • This is not the time to talk about all your personal details. Focus on who you are as a professional.
  • Because this question can be interpreted in many ways, do not be overwhelmed by it. Delve right in with your prepared answers.
Your elevator pitch
You need a short summary of yourself as a job candidate. Keep it focused, ideally less than a minute, and no more than two minutes.
  • Address what your primary selling points are for this job. The number of years of experience or special skill.  Focus on the qualifications in the job description and how you meet and exceed it.
  • Explain why you are interested in this position. 

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Getting Hired During The Pandemic
Getting Hired During The Pandemic

The recruitment process hasn’t changed much during the ongoing pandemic, apart from Zoom interviews, and the virtual onboarding.

Job seekers do not have much to tweak in their interview st...

Don't Let The Bad News Discourage You

We have to let go of the mindset of 'nobody is hiring now.'

Though we see in the news and on LinkedIn that companies are experiencing layoffs, and there are widespread hiring freezes and shutdowns, many sectors are showing remarkable growth. Digital education, Publishing, IT and Medical sectors are a few examples.

Get Out Of The Normal

We have to get out of the cocoon of a normal, expected job profile.

There are new opportunities emerging due to the pandemic, at the unlikeliest of places. One may be the right fit for a new kind of industry with a new kind of role.

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Questions for the Important Traits

Grit- ask on how determined a person in pursuing his dreams.

Rigor- ask if there was a time he considered a data to make a decision.

Impact- ask for what he have co...

When asking questions on the candidate's unique contribution..

Probe: give me an example…

Dig: who, what, where, when, why and how on every accomplishment or project

Differentiate: we vs. I, good vs. great, exposure vs. expertise, participant vs. owner/leader, 20 yard line vs. 80 yard line

Applying STAR questions

SituationWhat's the background of what you were working on?

TaskWhat tasks were you given?

ActionWhat actions did you take?

Results- What results did you measure?

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The Typical Job Interview Process
  1. Screening call or on-site interview: lengthy when done by HR and short when it’s someone technical, also not a good time to fire all your questions.
  2. Technical interview: ...
Questions For Your Screener

Have an introduction and a concise story to tell about your work history. Stack questions are mostly inappropriate here but you can ask the following:

  1. What is the hiring process? Be suspicious if they are asking for too much in one of the steps.
  2. Tell me about the tech team. Find more about the company’s hierarchies and the people who compose them.
Asking Questions On The Technical Interview

Prepare well for this. At the end of the meeting, they should ask if you have questions and you can ask as many as you need to help you decide to work there or not. You can use that to build rapport if the interview was a little off.

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Standing out
Standing out

Despite the high unemployment rates during the pandemic, companies are still hiring. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, companies employed 5.2 million people in April.

The differe...

A resume that stands out

A resume that stands out has been tailored specifically to each job and company you're pursuing.

If you have a job description, rewrite your resume to ensure you're highlighting the necessary skills and achievements the hiring manager is seeking. Use your keywords to write a story of why you're the best candidate for the job.

Show your impact areas

Hiring managers want to see that you can make a positive difference. That means you have to do your homework. Consider how the needs of the company intersect with your greatest wins and be prepared to talk about them.

Make it easy for them to understand what you can do for the team.

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The online job application process
The online job application process

Online applications can take hours of candidates' time when applying for a job. While some firms are moving away from these online systems, many companies move towards them.

A recen...

Most companies rely on ATS
  • With newer platforms, applicants have the option of using their LinkedIn profile instead of a CV. But they may still encounter customised questions that will require a significant investment of time.
  • LinkedIn's Easy Apply button on job listings allows candidates to submit their profiles without additional materials.
  • However, the majority of New York-based positions listed on LinkedIn rely on external ATS (Applicant tracking system) to manage applications.
ATS systems are not human friendly

What serves the employer well may not work for the prospective employee.

  • According to a survey, 60% of candidates may give up on an application if it's too long or complicated.
  • A cumbersome application process likely indicates the company's attitude towards its employees or overall culture.
  • It is a dispiriting process as even seasoned applicants receive a response only 5% of the time.

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Conduct the Effective Job Interview
  • Prepare your questions based on the attributes of an ideal candidate,
  • Reduce stress level. Tell the candidates in advance the questions you plan to ask.
  • Involve enoug...
Early times

Before the Industrial revolution, everyone worked out of their home and sold their goods from there. With the Industrial Revolution came the need for automation and factories, and employ...

From factories to cubicles to WiFi

Just after WW2, there was a rise in corporate headquarters and larger office spaces and cubicles. During this time, the 8-hour workday was established.

Then came the advancements in computers and technology that lead to remote workers of today. The internet and public WiFi allowed employees to do everything they would in their cubicle, but outside the office. They can also work all hours of the day.

Remote work is common

4.3 million people currently work from home in the United States at least half of the time, and this figure has grown by 150% in the last 13 years.  

Remote workers tend to have higher engagement rates and higher productivity levels. Once they switch to remote work, they rarely want to become office bound again.

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Why diversity matters.
Why diversity matters.

Diverse Companies with a wide range of employees enjoy broader skill sets, experiences, and points of view.

How to Increase Diversity and Boost Performance
  • Develop an equal opportunity policy.
  • Be transparent about hiring criteria.

  • Improve retention of minority workers.

  • Analyze problems and adapt. Train managers to spot their biases and avoid communicating in ways that unconsciously deter minority candidates.

  • Implement workplace flexibility.

Personal Connection

A sense of connection and belonging are sentiments that are helpful for building “affective trust” – a form of trust based on emotional bond and interpersonal relatedness.

It vari...

Statistics On Remote Workers
  • Loneliness was reported as the biggest downside for 21% of remote employees, and one of the reasons that makes them more likely to quit.
  • Most remote managers say they’d be more inclined to stay if they had more friends at work.
  • Individuals who have 15 minutes to socialize with colleagues have a 20% increase in performance over their peers who don't.
  • Positive social relationships are correlated with better life expectancy.
Dynamic Icebreakers

If your icebreaker questions are intriguing, cheeky, humorous – the answers you receive will be, too.

Many remote teams will kick off their weekly meeting with an icebreaker question or insert it during their morning stand-up meeting. Even more popular is asking a series of icebreaker questions during the onboarding process when hiring someone.

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