Change is inevitable - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Get an account to save ideas & make your own & organize them how you wish.

deepstash

Beta

Understanding the Kubler-Ross Change Curve

Change is inevitable

If a change is well planned, it can produce positive results. However, without planning, change can be hard to accept and appreciate.

The Kubler-Ross Model is the most reliable tool to understand change and the stages associated with it.

173 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Understanding the Kubler-Ross Change Curve

Understanding the Kubler-Ross Change Curve

https://www.cleverism.com/understanding-kubler-ross-change-curve/

cleverism.com

7

Key Ideas

Change is inevitable

If a change is well planned, it can produce positive results. However, without planning, change can be hard to accept and appreciate.

The Kubler-Ross Model is the most reliable tool to understand change and the stages associated with it.

The Kubler-Ross Model

The Kubler-Ross Model, also known as the five stages of grief, consists of the various levels of emotions that are experienced when facing trauma. The five stages are denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance.

After the model was widely accepted, it was found to be valid in a majority of cases and situations related to change.

Relevance in Business

The Kubler-Ross Change Curve is also true when it comes to business, work, or employment.  

Change can cause a lot of upheaval to the employees. If there are improvements to be made in systems and policies, the employees can't persist in their old ways. Only when the employees of an organization make personal change, can the company move ahead to reap the benefits.

The 5 stages of grief

  1. Denial: Shock or denial mark this stage and is usually short-lived. One may not believe what is happening. 
  2. Anger: When the realization hits and is understood, a person may become angry and look for a scapegoat. 
  3. Bargaining: When the anger subsides, one may start thinking about ways to postpone the inevitable and look for the best thing in the situation. 
  4. Depression: The person feels sadness, fear, regret, and guilt. They may reach a dead end where the road seems hopeless. 
  5. Acceptance: This is when people resign to the situation. It may not be a comfortable space, but the person may now move ahead with it.

The Change Curve in business

A reliable tool to understand what people are going through.

  • Stage 1: The employee will be in shock. They may need time to adjust. 
  • Stage 2: When the gravity of the situation settles in, workers may feel fear from what lies ahead, which may turn to anger and resentment. Clear communication and support should remain the focus at this level.
  • Stage 3: When employees understand that they must adapt, they may try to bargain with management, or learn as little as possible to adapt.  Don't rush employees to learn quickly or adjust fast.
  • Stage 4: The learning phase may be uncomfortable for employees and could result in low energies due to low morale. 
  • Stage 5: People finally start to embrace the change and start building new hopes and aspirations. 

The ADKAR Model

It demonstrates five ingredients needed for change.

  • Awareness: Awareness helps one understand why change is important and needed.
  • Desire: The desire to be a part of the change.
  • Knowledge: The desire is incomplete without knowing how change can be brought about.
  • Ability: All can be in vain if the individual does not have the ability to grow with it.
  • Reinforcement: This building block sustains the change.

Change management strategy

  1. Create: Establish a feeling of urgency or hurriedness towards change.
  2. Build: Formulate a guiding coalition.
  3. Form: Develop a strategy to bring about change. This requires having a plan and a vision.
  4. Enlist: One must now communicate or put forth the vision or strategy for change.
  5. Enable: Empower the employees to incorporate the changes.
  6. Generate: Formulate short-term goals and achieve them.
  7. Sustain: Capitalization of wins or gains in order to produce bigger results.
  8. Institute: Finally, incorporate new and better changes in the workplace culture.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Pre-Contemplation

In this stage of change, individuals are aware of the behavioral change they desire; however, they have no conscious intention of altering their behavior. They may be strongly influence...

Contemplation

In this stage of change, an individual acknowledges the problem and begins an internal debate about pursuing change. A lot of time may be spent in this stage as many may not be ready to commit to changing.

People often get stuck in this stage going back and forth between measuring the benefits and costs of behavioral change. A thorough cost-benefit analysis followed by a troubleshooting session can be helpful here, especially if it is done in written form.

Preparation

In this stage of change, individuals commit to the intention of changing in the immediate future and have accepted the costs and benefits. What determines the success of an individual in this stage is their commitment to exploring, planning and insuring.

Set up contracts with yourself, by setting specific measurable goals, and detailing how you will accomplish the task at hand, including contingencies in order to stay on track. 

2 more ideas

The Stages of Change
  1. Precontemplation: Not ready. Not now.
  2. Contemplation: Maybe soon — thinking about it.
  3. Preparation: Ready, taking small steps.
  4. Action: ...
Successful behavior change

One potential problem when changing behaviors is that we're too often motivated by negatives such as guilt, fear, or regret.

  • Research found that long-lasting change in behavior is mo...
Change is a process

... not an event. The transtheoretical model (TTM) presupposes that at any given time, a person is in one of five stages of change: precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, maintenance.

Each stage is a preparation for the next one, so you mustn't hurry through or skip stages.

Precontemplation

At this stage, you have no conscious intention of making a change. People in this stage tend to avoid reading, talking, or thinking about unhealthy behavior. However, their awareness and interest may be sparked by outside influences.

5 more ideas

We're feeling different griefs

We feel the world is different, and although temporary, we know it will not be the same again.

We feel the fear of economic turmoil and the loss of connection. And we're grieving c...

Anticipatory grief

Anticipatory grief is feeling unsure of what the future holds. It is that same feeling when someone gets a grave diagnosis. 

We know there is a storm brewing, and it breaks our sense of safety on a micro and a macro level.

Managing all this grief

Understand the stages of grief and realize that the stages are not linear.

Denial: The virus won't affect us.
Anger: You're taking away my freedom.
Bargaining: So, if I social distance for two weeks, will everything will be better?
Sadness: I don't know how this will end.
Acceptance: This is happening, and I have to figure out how to move forward.

Acceptance is where power lies. We find control in acceptance. "I can..."

4 more ideas

Leo Tolstoy

“Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself.”

Leo Tolstoy
About change

Organizations don’t change. People change. Many companies move to change systems and structures and create new policies and processes but fail to address the underlying mind-sets and capabilities of the people who will execute it.

A new strategy will fall short of its potential if they fail to address the mental attitude because people on the ground tend to continue to behave as they did before.

Looking both ways

Companies that only look outward in the process of organizational change, and dismiss individual learning and adaptation make two common mistakes:

  • They focus solely on business outcomes and fail to appreciate that people will have to adapt to implement it.
  • They focus too much on developing skills. 

9 more ideas

Take Your Time

Breaking up can trigger chemical, emotional and physical reactions that cause you to feel lonely, unloveable, depressed, and worthless. 

Instead of pushing yourself to move forward q...

Good Grief

The five stages of grief are: 

  • denial (inability to accept reality), 
  • anger (physical tension, frustration, resentment), 
  • bargaining (magical thinking, pleading to God), 
  • depression (sadness, emptiness, guilt, sleeplessness, loss of appetite, hopelessness),
  • acceptance. 
Become Anti-Social (Media)

Nothing good can come from looking at your ex’s Instagram stories or Facebook timeline. When it comes to social media, just say no.

4 more ideas

The most desired changes
The most desired changes

The so-called 'I can't wait!' change refers to the situation when you are excited about taking on a new job, getting married and all these big changes that you decide to undergo thr...

The necessary changes

The "I know I have to" beginnings are a bit more challenging to handle than the desired ones. This is mainly because we do the changes as we need to instead of actually wanting them.

These situations require courage, determination as well as building up a plan in steps about how to accomplish the change that needs to finally happen.

The forced change

This is the " Please don't make me do this" type of change.

Change can come both from inside and outside oneself. However, when somebody or something forces a change upon us, we tend to perceive the experience as being painful. Moreover, if we are prone to depression, it can actually put our health at risk. The best two ways to cope with this kind of situation is by either seeking professional help or starting to plan our recovery.

2 more ideas

Take some time off and let it out

It’s probably best not to suppress or hold back one’s emotions, especially immediately after a breakup. 

However, the emotions can be so intense that they may not be appropriate for publ...

Listen to sad music

In the short term, it might reinforce or flare up painful memories, but it also normalizes the grief you are feeling so that you know you're not alone.

Talk to supportive people

Family and friends can help, but make sure you recognize their limits as well. 

You may decide that professional help may provide a more neutral and long-lasting perspective. They can also point out deeper patterns of behavior or thinking.

5 more ideas

Positive Psychology's New Approach
Positive Psychology's New Approach
  • Due to its fleeting and fickle nature, our levels of happiness cannot be gauged, measured or rated accurately.
  • While earlier psychology focused on the bad apples,...
Four Types of Well-Being

To address the disconnect between happiness and deeper levels of satisfaction, researches proposed a model that characterizes people as falling into one of four well-being types.

  1. Optimizing one’s positive emotions, and denying the reality of their negative experiences.
  2. Feeling unhappy seeing the complexity of the world around them, and neglecting the positive aspects.
  3. Having a generally negative view of themselves and the world.
  4. Having a generally positive and empathetic view of the world.
The Real Meaning Of Happiness

Being happy means more than feeling good. True happiness comes from handling challenging and adverse situations, while collaborating and building lifelong bonds with the people in our lives.

A collective thinking process, where the good of all is considered leads to a level of happiness that cannot be attained by being selfish or self-concerned.