The Kübler-Ross Model of Grieving - Deepstash

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The Kübler-Ross Model of Grieving

The Kübler-Ross Model of Grieving

Grief comes in many forms and everyone has experienced it in many different ways, but this model theory is only a reference, not a rule. The five stages of grief are:

  • Denial
  • Anger
  • Bargaining
  • Depression
  • Acceptance.

The five stages of grief were once known as the five stages of death, however, Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, the Swiss American psychiatrist that invented this theory extended her model to many different kinds of losses.

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Many people believe that there is a right and wrong way to grieve, but in reality, there isn't. Grieving isn't about following a list of steps and then getting over the situation right after. It's a unique journey and is experienced differently by everyone, some might go through every pha...

Pain takes shape in many different forms and often redirected or expressed as anger. A lot of people reject this feeling because of its intensity and sometimes because of their culture.

  1. It is important to express your needs to trusted people such as your friends or family members. Allow them to help you in the ways you feel will best suit your needs;
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Acceptance is not about being okay with what happened, rather it is about acknowledging the loss and learning to live with it, and readjusting our lives accordingly.

We're not referring to clinical depression in this instance when talking about depression, but as a natural and appropriate response to grief.

  1. The best support comes from just being there and making it clear that you’re available to listen to the things they want to share with you;
  2. It can be frigthening to message someone who is grieving and check up on them, but don't let fear stop you f...

This is a common defense mechanism that buffers the immediate shock felt during unexpected situations. We may often fantasize about the untruths and hope that the news we've received isn't real.

This is the stage of grieving where you try to find a way to hold on to hope in order to cope with intense pain; where we are willing to do anything and sacrifice everything just so that things could go back to the way they were.

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