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Marie Kondo cleaned house. Now she wants to fix your whole life

Declutter Your World

Declutter Your World

Takumi Kawahara and Marie Kondo, a couple from Japan, are co-founders of KonMari Media. They have a bestseller (authored by Kondo) about decluttering and cleaning your world, and also a highly popular Netflix series of the same topic: Decluttering and Cleaning.

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Marie Kondo cleaned house. Now she wants to fix your whole life

Marie Kondo cleaned house. Now she wants to fix your whole life

https://www.fastcompany.com/90490761/marie-kondo-cleaned-house-now-she-wants-to-fix-your-whole-life

fastcompany.com

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Key Ideas

Declutter Your World

Takumi Kawahara and Marie Kondo, a couple from Japan, are co-founders of KonMari Media. They have a bestseller (authored by Kondo) about decluttering and cleaning your world, and also a highly popular Netflix series of the same topic: Decluttering and Cleaning.

Tidying Up with Marie Kondo

The Netflix Show ‘Tidying Up with Marie Kondo’ is the most-watched non-fiction show on the platform. She is now at par with Martha Stewart, Oprah, and Gwyneth Paltrow, as a goddess of wellness and domesticity.

She has an e-commerce website, blog, newsletter, and does consultation work in over 40 countries through her personally created brand. 

The Criticism

Marie Kondo’s decluttering philosophy, which became a rage, invited critics to label her as someone who has an anti-capitalist agenda that can cripple the economy. 

She was also labeled as someone who only appeals to the rich. This unwanted attention resulted in even more business opportunities.

The Personality Of Kondo

The commitment and pure dedication of Marie Kondo are evident in her body language and facial expressions and is a huge driver of the appeal of the Netflix show.

Kondo’s decluttering techniques are highly sought after, resulting in unprecedented growth and demand, including items for sale that ‘spark joy’, available on her online store.

Decluttering Early

Along with the of conquering the corporate world, Kondo is also focussing on kids, by providing educational material, flashcards and even a picture book aimed at educating kids to sort and declutter. By introducing these habits early in children’s lives, kids will avoid the problem altogether.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing
It explores how putting your space in order causes correspondingly dramatic changes in lifestyle and perspective.

Marie Kondo, the author, recommends that you start by discarding an...

The problem with storage

Putting things away creates the illusion that the clutter problem has been solved.

Organizing all your junk better does not equal getting rid of clutter. And unfortunately most people leap at storage methods that promise quick and convenient ways to remove visible clutter.

Tidy by category, not by location

For example, set goals like “clothes today, books tomorrow.” 

We often store the same type of item in more than one place and when we tidy each place separately, we fail to see that we’re repeating the same work in many locations. 

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5-Step Decluttering Cheat Sheet
  1. Discarding by category comes first (clothes first, then books, papers etc.)
  2. Break a category into subcategories (e.g. Tops: shirts, sweaters etc.)
  3. Keep on...
KonMari is not full-proof

If you're single, or a couple with a small pet in a tiny apartment it may work. But if you're a large family in a larger space you'll have to pick and choose what works otherwise outsource some ...

Pros of the KonMari Method
  1. Decluttering in one shot allows for immediate transformation: If you tidy a little at a time, you would tidy forever because you wouldn't see the drastic results.
  2. Sorting by category instead of by room can save you time.
  3. The emphasis is keeping only what "sparks joy": Will help you better decide what to keep, and also give you a greater appreciation for what you have.
  4. You let go of your stuff with gratitude for the usefulness they served
Cons of the KonMari Method
  1. This process may not be realistic for larger spaces or families: This guide is written from the point of view of a single woman in her early 30's who lives in a small flat in Japan.
  2. Category sorting may not be as effective if you have a family.
  3. Untagging clothes and immediately hanging them in your closet doesn't always make sense.
  4. The book doesn't address how to deal with children's toys.
The new buzzword

The "pursuit of joy" seems to be the new buzzword to counter the fear of missing out phenomenon.

What brings you joy? Joy is pared with cleaning up our cluttered lives: from household clu...

Life clutter builds up

We are constantly invited to do something, think something, experience something or buy something.

For every social event or task we say yes to, we run the risk of overfilling our lives. It may leave us feeling overstretched, overtired and overwhelmed.

Inability to say "no"

There is often an underlying fear that prevents us from saying no. Perhaps we fear that we are not good enough. We find the compulsive "yes" might help us feel better. However, we cannot continue living at this pace.

We need to ask ourselves why we continue to do the very things that make us unhappy. Self-restraint and missing out are vital for our well-being.

The junk drawer
The junk drawer

The "junk drawer" has become a universally acknowledged space where you store all the things that doesn't seem to have a place. It is not always a drawer - it could be a room,...

Discard before organizing

Don't think how you will organise items if you're still considering what to keep. You can only assess available storage space when you're done decluttering.

Sort and throw away first before you put back the stuff you've been collecting in your junk drawer.

Tidy by category, not location

Gather all the items of one category in one spot. You can only decide what to keep and what to discard if you know what you have and how much you have.

Categorization is important in the process of decluttering. The five main categories are clothes, books, paper, miscellaneous, mementos. Gather and assess all like items at the same time. If you have two junk drawers, tackle the objects in both spaces at the same time.

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The KonMari Method
It emphasizes tidying by category (not by location) beginning with clothes, then moving on to books, papers, komono (miscellaneous items), and, finally, sentimental items.
Keep ...
The 6 basic rules of tidying
  1. Commit yourself to tidying up.
  2. Imagine your ideal lifestyle.
  3. Finish discarding first.
  4. Tidy by category, not by location.
  5. Follow the right order.
  6. Ask yourself if it sparks joy.
The new minimalism

In part, the new minimalism is a kind of cultural aftershock of the 2008 housing crisis and banking collapse. At the same time, minimalism has become an increasingly aspirational and deluxe way ...

Minimalism for the affluent

Many people have minimalism forced upon them by circumstance. Poverty and trauma can make frivolous possessions seem like a lifeline instead of a burden.

Although many of today's gurus insist that minimalism is useful regardless of income, they target the affluent. The focus on self-improvement is more about accumulation.

Minimalism of ideas

True minimalism is not about throwing things out, but about challenging your beliefs in an attempt to engage with ideas as they are, to not shy away from reality or its lack of answers. 

Underneath the vision of “less” is a mode of living that heightens the miracle of human presence.

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Working from a comfortable home
Working from a comfortable home

While working from home during the current pandemic, you might want to consider tips that could make your life easier.

For instance, making sure that you feel joyful and productive at ...

Separating private from professional life

While working remotely, it might turn up to be quite challenging to separate private from professional life. This is why you should try to find a ritual that has the role to set the boundaries between the two.

Furthermore, you could also place the things you use while working in a separate place from your personal belongings.

Home office in a shared home

Working remotely is likely to become permanent in many companies, given the uncertainty of the current situation.

While doing home office can be quite a piece of cake when you live alone, it might become a challenge if you live with somebody else. The most important is that both you and your partner know exactly how to support and help each other in order for things to function properly.

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There is no single way to lead a minimalist life
There is no single way to lead a minimalist life

Minimalism is often seen as an all-white room containing few furniture pieces. There are no colors or patterns or decorative accents that don't serve some function. However, this is not true.

Minimalism can help you save money

Instead of trying to find ways to make more money, minimalists contemplate the opposite: They live with less.

Minimalists find that after going through simplifying their lives and their interiors, they feel more at peace and in charge of their surroundings.

Decluttering can be emotional

Getting started on the road to minimalism can be the hardest. Once you realise how much you own, it can be overwhelming and fill you with guilt about the money wasted.

After decluttering, you may encounter another emotional factor: When you live with just the things you really love, breaking something will feel way more dramatic.

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Take Stock and Track Your Time

You can’t really clean up your schedule if you don’t know what’s in it—and that includes all the things on your literal and official calendar and all the things that aren’t. 

Purge Recurring Meetings and Tasks

Once you know what’s on your calendar, ask yourself: “What is the purpose of each thing on here? Are we accomplishing that or does something need to change?” 

Question each task. Start with recurring meetings, which can very easily build up and take over your calendar.

Sort Things By Importance and Urgency

... and put them in one of four quadrants:

  • Quadrant I: Important, Urgent (crises, last-minute meetings for important deadlines)
  • Quadrant II: Important, Not Urgent (strategic planning, long-term goal setting)
  • Quadrant III: Not Important, Urgent (certain emails, phone calls, meetings, and events)
  • Quadrant IV: Not Important, Not Urgent (scrolling mindlessly through social media, binge-watching TV you don’t really care about).

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