Misophonic responses - Deepstash

Misophonic responses

Anger is the most common misophonic response, followed by anxiety or disgust.

In misophonia, people react to sounds that are not widely considered unpleasant, such as whispering or soft breathing.

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Misophonics are unable to ignore annoying sounds. It seems that selective attention may be impaired in these individuals. The only option when their attention becomes fixated on a trigger sound may be fight or flight.

The condition and treatment are still in its infancy, although some evidence suggests that cognitive-behavioral therapy may help.

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Misophonia

Misophonia is a neurophysiological condition where people have an excessively negative reaction to specific sounds, like slurping, humming, tapping, typing, or texting.

Misophonia means "hatred of sound" and people with this condition are aware of their overreaction, but can't control their reaction.

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The aversion to trigger sounds develops in childhood and tends to get worse over time.

The sounds are commonly related to the mouth, nasal sound, and hand sounds, and are more distressing if family members produce them.

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People with misophonia are affected emotionally by common sounds like breathing, chewing — usually ones that other people don’t pay attention to. Common sounds triggers anger and a desire to escape. It affects some worse than others and can lead to isolation, as people suffering from this condition try to avoid these trigger sounds. People who have misophonia often feel embarrassed and don’t mention it to healthcare providers. Nonetheless, misophonia is a real disorder and one that seriously compromises functioning, socializing, and ultimately mental health. It can usually appear around age 12

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Tinnitus: Non-Stop Ringing In The Ears
  • Tinnitus, the ringing or noise in the ears is annoying, and most of us experience it temporarily when we hear a loud noise.
  • Aspirin and other anti-inflammatory drugs also cause it to appear.
  • Chronic tinnitus, the one that lasts for more than six months, is a problem experienced by 50 to 60 million Americans.
  • Most cases are a personal noise experience, though other people can also hear the sound in some cases. Tinnitus is a diverse kind of problem and is more likely in older people.

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Flying Changes our Mind and Body

Taking a flight creates physical and emotional changes in us, something that is now being more extensively researched. Air travel can change our mood, make us emotionally weak (more crying) or sad, and even change how our senses work.

The factors responsible for this phenomenon are the high altitude, the reduced air pressure, inadequate oxygen going in the brain and overall anxiety associated with flying.

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