The wrong criteria

Some managers favor candidates who went to the same school. There's also evidence that African-American sounding names, birthmarks, being pregnant, and being overweight puts candidates at a disadvantage.

To overcome this bias, identify the key skills and values in advance, then create a standard set of behavioral and situational questions to ask every candidate. Doing this can triple the manager's accuracy in predicting job performance.

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The wrong questions

Some questions are too easy to fake, for example, "What's your greatest weakness?" Other questions like brainteasers reveal more about the manager than the candidate.

Behavioral questions about a past experience can help anticipate future behavior. "Tell me about a time when..." Include some situational questions. "What would you do if..." Pick something that is important for success in the job and work culture.

College seniors often stretch the truth in interviews to make a better impression. Be aware that when you meet someone for the first time, you meet their representative.

An antidote could include to let them showcase their skills by collecting a work sample. It might be a project they've done in the past or a live simulation of the job in real-time.

Credentials may be overrated, but motivation is often underrated. A candidate may have a lot of experience but may lack the drive to think creatively and work collaboratively. The right candidate will also be hungry and eager to improve.

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Quirky Interview Questions

Most of us prepare in advance for the usual questions at an interview, which may not be very creative (“Name three of your biggest weaknesses?”). Some crazy questions can take us by surprise, like:

  • What flavour of icecream do you see yourself as?
  • How many pencils would fit inside this room?

These questions test our presence of mind, creativity, poise and preparedness for the unexpected.

4

IDEAS

  1. Truly understand what you need and and tailor everything in your selection process finding the perfect person.
  2. Determine how you will find the perfect person to fill need that need. You don't want the best of what you saw. You want the best person for the job.
  3. Explain the process to the interviewee.
  4. Have a background check on the candidate before the interview.
  5. Make the interview a conversation, not an interrogation.
  6. Always ask follow up questions.
  7. Spend as much time answering questions as you do asking.
  8. Describe the next steps, don't let him be the one who ask.
  9. Provide closure every time. Failing to follow up is incredibly rude.
  10. Observe on how they act with other people before the interview.
  11. Check out the references of the candidate.
  12. Conduct one more interview to be positive that you're choosing the right one.
  13. Make an enthusiastic offer.
What you should not say
  • Starting with something personal like family or hobbies, or launching into your life story.
  • Sharing the problems with your current job.
  • Summarizing your resume, point-by-point. Assume that your interviewers read your resume before inviting you in for the interview.

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