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Job Interviews Are Broken. There's a Way to Fix Them.

The wrong criteria

Some managers favor candidates who went to the same school. There's also evidence that African-American sounding names, birthmarks, being pregnant, and being overweight puts candidates at a disadvantage.

To overcome this bias, identify the key skills and values in advance, then create a standard set of behavioral and situational questions to ask every candidate. Doing this can triple the manager's accuracy in predicting job performance.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Job Interviews Are Broken. There's a Way to Fix Them.

Job Interviews Are Broken. There's a Way to Fix Them.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/01/smarter-living/how-to-fix-job-interviews-tips.html

nytimes.com

4

Key Ideas

The wrong questions

Some questions are too easy to fake, for example, "What's your greatest weakness?" Other questions like brainteasers reveal more about the manager than the candidate.

Behavioral questions about a past experience can help anticipate future behavior. "Tell me about a time when..." Include some situational questions. "What would you do if..." Pick something that is important for success in the job and work culture.

The wrong criteria

Some managers favor candidates who went to the same school. There's also evidence that African-American sounding names, birthmarks, being pregnant, and being overweight puts candidates at a disadvantage.

To overcome this bias, identify the key skills and values in advance, then create a standard set of behavioral and situational questions to ask every candidate. Doing this can triple the manager's accuracy in predicting job performance.

Favoring the best talkers

College seniors often stretch the truth in interviews to make a better impression. Be aware that when you meet someone for the first time, you meet their representative.

An antidote could include to let them showcase their skills by collecting a work sample. It might be a project they've done in the past or a live simulation of the job in real-time.

The best candidate

Credentials may be overrated, but motivation is often underrated. A candidate may have a lot of experience but may lack the drive to think creatively and work collaboratively. The right candidate will also be hungry and eager to improve.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

'So, Tell me about Yourself'

... or some version of that is one of the most fundamental and common questions asked in any first round of a Job Interview.

Hiring managers usually like to ask this question, because it ...

Short vs long answers

The conventional expert opinion is to provide a crisp, 30 second to 1-minute answer to the question "Tell me about yourself", but one minute isn’t enough time to deliver a meaningful response that benefits you as a candidate.

Experts prefer a short answer, as it has less chance of leading the candidate to drift or ramble.

Benefits of a long answer
  • A longer answer to "Tell me about yourself" allows you to provide a useful narrative beyond the résumé.
  • It lets you reveal key motivations that drove your career path.
  • You can shape the interview in your direction.
  • It's an opportunity to stand out from the other candidates.
What you should not say
  • Starting with something personal like family or hobbies, or launching into your life story.
  • Sharing the problems with your current job.
  • Summarizing your resume, point-by-point....
Craft an elevator pitch
  • Spend some time reviewing the job description in the recruitment ad for the position and research the company.
  • Prepare a short script that highlights the skills, strengths and expertise you have that make you especially qualified for this particular position. 
  • Explain the reasons you’re applying for this particular job. Focus on career-related motivations.
Your purpose to the question

Your purpose to the question "tell me about yourself" is to give just enough details of yourself to spark the interest of the interviewer.

Answering this question gives you a great opportunity to spotlight the skills and experience that make you the ideal candidate for the job.

Conduct the Effective Job Interview
  • Prepare your questions based on the attributes of an ideal candidate,
  • Reduce stress level. Tell the candidates in advance the questions you plan to ask.
  • Involve enoug...
The Interviewer’s Perspective

When the interviewer asks you, “Tell me about yourself”, he is hoping this question will get you talking. It will give him a first impression of you, and set the tone for the inte...

How Not to Answer
  • Prepare a brief summary of the high points of each of your past positions, but do not turn it into a very long monologue that makes the interviewer glaze over with information overload.
  • You do not have to brag, but don't rely on the interviewer to see past your humble exterior and figure out how great you are. Find a way to present yourself to your full advantage.
  • This is not the time to talk about all your personal details. Focus on who you are as a professional.
  • Because this question can be interpreted in many ways, do not be overwhelmed by it. Delve right in with your prepared answers.
Your elevator pitch
You need a short summary of yourself as a job candidate. Keep it focused, ideally less than a minute, and no more than two minutes.
  • Address what your primary selling points are for this job. The number of years of experience or special skill.  Focus on the qualifications in the job description and how you meet and exceed it.
  • Explain why you are interested in this position. 

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Conduct the Perfect Job Interview
  1. Truly understand what you need and and tailor everything in your selection process finding the perfect person.
  2. Determine how you will find the perfect person to fi...
Standing out
Standing out

Despite the high unemployment rates during the pandemic, companies are still hiring. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, companies employed 5.2 million people in April.

The differe...

A resume that stands out

A resume that stands out has been tailored specifically to each job and company you're pursuing.

If you have a job description, rewrite your resume to ensure you're highlighting the necessary skills and achievements the hiring manager is seeking. Use your keywords to write a story of why you're the best candidate for the job.

Show your impact areas

Hiring managers want to see that you can make a positive difference. That means you have to do your homework. Consider how the needs of the company intersect with your greatest wins and be prepared to talk about them.

Make it easy for them to understand what you can do for the team.

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Hire Originals at Startups
  • To develop a resilient culture. An environment with people who think differently will put you into much better position to continuous innovation.
  • To anticipate market movemen...
Originals and Where to Find Them
  • Unsung Heroes. For each major innovation or movement, there are catalysts that fade into the background of what they create.
  • Insubordinates. It's important to triage troublemakers, but in doing so, don't miss an original in your midst.
  • Those who have been fired. The ones who do not worry about pleasing others or fitting in.
  • Inward-facing innovators. People that even though work privately, create extreme impact.
Adam Grant
Adam Grant

“Values over rules are key for encouraging originality.”

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"I’m a good problem solver"

Focusing on problem-solving implies that a candidate possesses secondary skills including critical thinking, strategic thinking, and leadership.

Demonstrate your problem-solving abilities...

"I’m a good communicator"

Communication encompasses not only speaking skills, but also your ability to lead, critique, and ask for help. Being adept in various communication methods also shows emotional intelligence.

"I have strong time management skills"

Time management is more than just completing tasks on time. An employer cares about how you spend the time leading up to a deadline as well.

Demonstrate your strength in this area by sharing how you prioritize your daily tasks.
Using the 80/20 rule for project prioritization can show how you best schedule your time to give your full attention to critical project tasks.

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Subjective Evaluation In Interviews
Subjective Evaluation In Interviews

On the employer’s side, the entire job interview process is subjective, from the shortlisting of applications to the screening phone call, and finally when the candidate is at the door.

The Interview Performance
  • Usually, a typical job interview has the employer(s) sit in a room (or a video conference software) and make them answer unstructured questions, gauging their ability to charm them, and appear as the right fit by feeling like ‘one of the gang’. The candidate is selected or rejected based on how good he ‘performed’ on the interview day.
  • Charisma can also be faked during an interview process, and the interviewer can be duped into hiring a wrong candidate who was able to manufacture charm and likeability to get selected. This makes hiring based on what is portrayed by the candidate to be inherently flawed.
Discrimination And Bias in Interviews

In an ideal world, the competence of a person should get him or her the job. In reality, bias gets in the way and is normally related to age, gender, race, appearance and even social class.

Another common mistake is to hire someone who is well-liked by the interviewer due to them being similar. This eventually narrows down the range of skill sets and diversity of thinking in the workplace.

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