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Psychology is Changing. This Is What You Need To Know

Understand the process

Understand the process

There has recently been an important change in the way clinical psychology is being handled.

Nowadays, it can be clearly seen that what is the most important is the understanding of what has led to the specific mental illness, of its underlying process rather than of the therapy itself.

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Psychology is Changing. This Is What You Need To Know

Psychology is Changing. This Is What You Need To Know

https://www.psychologytoday.com/intl/blog/dark-side-psychology/202006/psychology-is-changing-is-what-you-need-know

psychologytoday.com

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Key Ideas

Understand the process

There has recently been an important change in the way clinical psychology is being handled.

Nowadays, it can be clearly seen that what is the most important is the understanding of what has led to the specific mental illness, of its underlying process rather than of the therapy itself.

Process Based Therapy

Process Based Therapy bases itself on Network Science, which emphasis the importance of networks, nodes and possible barriers to change in order to get a better understanding of the mental illnesses.

Process Based Therapy implies the belief that variation and flexibility are the elements that influence the most your recovery.

Extended Evolutionary Meta Model

This Meta Model refers to the idea according to which dynamic and complex networks change or shift dramatically rather than gradually.

When this occurs, the so-called Process Based Therapy aims to turn the network from maladaptive to adaptive while using strategies such as exposure or mindfulness.

Change and its necessity

Change in clinical psychology has led to discovering the Process Based Therapy that is, by all means, a great evolution in the field.

What makes PBT so special is the fact that this therapy involves flexibility when handling the issue, which can only result in good consequences for an individual's self perception.

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