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The Type of Team Diversity You’re Probably Not Paying Attention To

People of the Will-type

People driven by will are motivated to be in control. They make sense of the world around them through results, or through the plan that gets them there.

  • The strengths: They want to get the job done and pursue the goal with intense focus. They are highly competent.
  • The challenges: They are more autocratic. They are ambitious to the exclusion of relationships and may drive for perfectionism where "good enough" is a better outcome.
  • How to spot them: They are good decision-makers. They relish in creating step-by-step plans and executing them.

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The Type of Team Diversity You’re Probably Not Paying Attention To

The Type of Team Diversity You’re Probably Not Paying Attention To

https://firstround.com/review/the-type-of-team-diversity-youre-probably-not-paying-attention-to/

firstround.com

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Key Ideas

The Heart/Will/Head model

The Heart/Will/Head model defines three types of people and how they view the world around them.

Using this model is valuable for managers to build stronger teams en get the best work out of each member.

The secret to scaling: People

The secret to scaling is the people. People generally want to do the right thing if you set them up for success with the right conditions. They want to grow, develop, and have a meaningful impact. They don't need to be coerced or controlled.

Effectively scaling an organisation is then connected to helping people grow.

The Heart/Will/Head model: Components

The model breaks people into three types, each of which sees the world through one primary lens:

  • The heart - People of this type need to be liked
  • The will - People of this type desires to be in control and win
  • The head - People of the type wants to be smart.

We usually have a dominant type that we've come to rely on as a coping strategy. Each type demonstrates key positive attributes and negative ones. This model's strength is to highlight the positive qualities of your type while reducing the negative.

People of the Heart-type

People of this type are motivated first and foremost by relationships. Achieving something together is as important as the end results.

  • The strengths: They tend to be skilled at building a sense of community. They have strong interpersonal skills and are ready to lend a hand.
  • The challenges: They are less inclined to make big, bold moves. They prefer to be compliant and may prioritize pleasing somebody over doing the right thing. It an effort not to rock the boat, they may fail to speak up and share valuable ideas.
  • How to spot them: They tend to be your team's best collaborators.

People of the Will-type

People driven by will are motivated to be in control. They make sense of the world around them through results, or through the plan that gets them there.

  • The strengths: They want to get the job done and pursue the goal with intense focus. They are highly competent.
  • The challenges: They are more autocratic. They are ambitious to the exclusion of relationships and may drive for perfectionism where "good enough" is a better outcome.
  • How to spot them: They are good decision-makers. They relish in creating step-by-step plans and executing them.

People of the Head-type

This type needs to engage intellectually and philosophically and is most concerned with the direction the organization is moving.

  • The strengths: They are 'big vision' people and thrive when they're setting goals for a team.
  • The challenges: They tend to distance themselves from emotions and can become overly critical of themselves or others.
  • How to spot them: They need to understand the big picture before they can start talking about the details. They are also known for their strong integrity.

What every team needs

Every team should have all three types of the Heart/Will/Head model represented to cover your bases and build a team fully equipped. The key is to avoid the trap of hiring only people who think as you do.

Practically speaking, every interview panel should have each type represented - heart, will, and head. Once your team is built, help each member understand the complete Heart/Will/Head model - not just their own type. This will ensure an appreciation for what other types contribute.

Applying the Heart/Will/Head model to yourself

This model is equally valuable for individuals. The more you understand why you react in a certain way, the greater control you get over those reactions, enhancing the good and reducing the weaknesses of your own type. Regularly ask yourself these questions:

  • Heart: Am I spending too much time trying to please others? Can I be more decisive? Can I look past the individual relationship and see the bigger picture?
  • Will: Am I making decisions to autocratically? How can I encourage better team play? Can I engage more authentically?
  • Head: Am I too critical of myself and others? How can I build more caring connections with others? What would it take to bring more strategic focus to my work?

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