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How Important is Growth? | Scott H Young

Progressive habits are about managing growth, while consistent habits  are  are about managing decline. Progressive habits are less stable, but offer higher growth. Consistent habits offer lower growth, but are more stable.

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How Important is Growth? | Scott H Young

How Important is Growth? | Scott H Young

https://www.scotthyoung.com/blog/2018/09/11/how-important-is-growth/

scotthyoung.com

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Key Ideas

The 2 ways you can approach your habits: Progressive and Consistent

  • Progressive. You start off easy, make it a little bit harder each time, until you eventually do very difficult things, with a lot less effort.
  • Consistent. Do the same thing, with the same expectations, each time. You don’t aim for growth, but maintaining the same, solid baseline.

Progressive habits are about managing growth, while consistent habits  are  are about managing decline. Progressive habits are less st...

Progressive habits are about managing growth, while consistent habits  are  are about managing decline. Progressive habits are less stable, but offer higher growth. Consistent habits offer lower growth, but are more stable.

When you set up a progressive habit, you’re on a path to improvement

Small, incremental adjustments in difficulty are almost certain to push your level up. The downside with progressive habits is that they are harder to sustain.

Progressive habits vs.Consistent habits

  • Progressive habits can be better if you expect low decline or a continued, long-term focus on growth. If this area of life is going to remain under the spotlight for you in the future, you can probably keep pushing progressive training habits. 
  • Consistent habits are better when the domain of life you’re trying to improve rarely is your biggest priority. 

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