How to shop for a clean diet - Deepstash

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A dietitian's guide to 'clean eating': what it is and how to do it right

How to shop for a clean diet

  • Whole foods come first. Wholefoods don't need labels with ingredients.
  • Cut or eliminate ultra-processed foods that contain synthetic chemicals, pesticides, and artificial colors, flavors, sweeteners, and preservatives.
  • Choose minimally processed foods. It is food where, if you wanted to, you could find all the ingredients and make it yourself.
  • Focus on healthy oils such as olives and avocados.
  • Where you can, choose organic and no added hormone milk, cheese, yoghurt, and butter.
  • Select meats, poultry, eggs, and seafood with no hormones administered or antibiotics added.
  • Take care when choosing plant-based proteins as an alternative to meat as they can be highly processed and contain fillers, preservatives, and artificial ingredients.

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